Arthur Voorhees’46
Dear Editor,
While I was delighted and inspired by the “Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center at 75” issue, I was disappointed that there was no mention of the single most significant contribution made in our Department of Surgery (in the opinion of many who know of it). It was the work of Arthur B. Voorhees’46 which truly revolutionized vascular surgery and, in fact, has made possible much of vascular surgery as we have since known it. It was in a landmark paper, “The use of tubes constructed from vinyon “N” cloth in bridging arterial defects” (Annals of Surgery Vol. 135: 332-336, 1952), that Dr. Voorhees, here at P&S, introduced the world to the ability to unite blood vessels with synthetic materials. I hope that an opportunity will present itself to bring this to the attention of those readers who are not acquainted with this important part of our history.

KENNETH A. FORDE’59,
JOSÉ M. FERRER PROFESSOR AND VICE CHAIRMAN
FOR EXTERNAL AFFAIRS, P&S DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY

Dear Editor,
Just received my copy of the Fall P&S Journal and turned to the article on the School of Public Health by Will Wade. It’s interesting and brought back more than a few memories for me. One error appears. On Page 51 Mr. Wade mentions Dr. Haven Emerson, a giant in the early days of public health in New York. He then writes about Dr. Emerson’s successor, a Dr. Henry Mustard. The man’s correct name is Harry Mustard and he too was an early pioneer in public health both in the government and in the private sector. The reason I’m aware of this segment of the history is that I worked under both these men.

JOHN T. CONNOLLY, SPH‘51, BY E-MAIL

Dear Editor,
The last issue of the journal (Fall 2003) was fabulous. I am saving it for my grandchildren to read when they become adults. The short biographies of many of the "main physicians" in the history of P&S are priceless. They brought back marvelous memories of Dr. Loeb, Dr. Atchley, Dr. Brown, etc. They all were superb teachers of medicine. Thank you, and continue your excellent work with the magazine.

STAN EDELMAN'53, BY E-MAIL

Dear Editor,
I always look forward to reading the bios Nick Christy writes. The Fall 2002 issue was no exception. (James Burns Amberson Jr., 1890-1979, “Faculty Remembered,” Vol. 22, No. 3). I believe I only saw J. Burns once, at Bellevue and one of his X-ray rounds. He came in a little late and looked at the X-ray and made some astounding conclusion. I was very impressed, but went into ob/gyn anyway.

RICHARD BANFIELD’51, BY E-MAIL

Dear Editor,
Today I had the good fortune of talking to Nick Christy’51, our author of “Faculty Remembered.” Nick’s contributions to our annals are invaluable. They serve to remind us of our heritage as associates for P&S whether as students, teachers, researchers or support personnel (spouses and offspring included). We owe Nick a debt of gratitude for capturing the essence of our forebears with elegance and accuracy.

BILL BAUMAN’47, BY E-MAIL

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Editor, P&S Journal
College of Physicians & Surgeons
630 W. 168th St.
New York, NY 10032
E-mail: psjournal@columbia.edu

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