P&S News

News from around the
College of Physicians & Surgeons

  Commencement 2009
  Faculty Awards
  Student Awards and Prizes
  New Columbia-Bassett Program
  New M.S. Degree in Narrative Medicine
  The Rachmaninoff Piano
  In Nicaragua
  Team Peej
  Garvey Academy
  Residency Match 2009

Commencement 2009
Commencement 2009Commencement 2009Commencement 2009
Commencement 2009Commencement 2009Commencement 2009
Commencement 2009

commencement PHoTOs CREDIT: Island Photo

Faculty Awards
P&S Distinguished Service Awards were presented to Eric J. Hall, Ph.D., D.Sc., professor emeritus of radiology and radiation oncology, for preclinical years, and Alfred Jaretzki III, M.D., professor emeritus of clinical surgery, for clinical years.


Charles W. Bohmfalk Awards were presented to Jai Radhakrishnan, M.D., associate professor of clinical medicine, for pre-clinical years, and Deborah L. Cabaniss, M.D., associate clinical professor of psychiatry, for clinical years.


The Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award presented by the Arnold P. Gold Foundation was given to David Roye, M.D., the St. Giles Foundation Professor of Clinical Pediatric Orthopedic Surgery.


Dr. Harold and Golden Lamport Research Awards in basic sciences were given to Aniruddha Das, Ph.D., assistant professor of neuroscience, and Eric Greene, Ph.D., assistant professor of biochemistry & molecular biophysics. R. Graham Barr, M.D., Dr.P.H., the Florence Irving Assistant Professor of Medicine, received a Dr. Harold and Golden Lamport Research Award in clinical sciences.


The Stevens Triennial Prize was awarded to Robert J. Lefkowitz, M.D., the James B. Duke Professor of Medicine, professor of biochemistry, and professor in immunology at Duke University.


The Distinguished Teacher Award was given by the Class of 2009 to Noel Robin, M.D., chair of the Department of Medicine at Stamford Hospital.

Student Awards and Prizes

AOA (Alpha Omega Alpha, the national honor society for medicine) Catherine Albright, Rakhee Bowker, Katherine Carson, Michael Cutalo, Koushik Das, Gillian Diercks, Jacob Doll, Barry Fine, Sarah Goglin, Jordan Jacobs, Kristine Kay, Kristen Knoll, Amy Lunding, Marc Manseau, Cameron Marshall, Maxwell Merkow, Charles Mikell, Matthew Oliff, Olufoladare Olorunsola, Charles Resor, Xavier Simcock, Meghan Sise, David Tsay, Jason Van Batavia, Lauren Wasson, Janette Zuk

Dr. Harry S. Altman Award (outstanding achievement in pediatric ambulatory care) Holly H. Martin

Alumni Association Award (outstanding service to P&S) Hadi J. Halazun

AAN Medical Student Prize for Excellence in Neurology Marianna Shnayderman

Virginia P. Apgar Award (excellence in anesthesiology) Kaliq T. Chang

Michael H. Aranow Memorial Prize (best exemplifying the caring and humane qualities of the practicing physician) Sarah E. Goglin, Amy M. Lunding

Herbert J. Bartelstone Award (exceptional accomplishments in pharmacology) Jason Van Batavia

Behrens Memorial Prize in Ophthalmology (outstanding graduate entering ophthalmology) Ankoor R. Shah

Edward T. Bello, M.D., Listening Award (to a graduating student who best portrays the art of listening to patients, colleagues, and self in practicing the chosen field of medicine) Lauren S. Wasson

Robert G. Bertsch Prize (emulating Dr. Bertsch’s ideals of the humane surgeon) Mark W. Maxfield

Brunie Prize in Neural Stem Cell Research Masoud F. Tavazoie

Coakley Memorial Prize (outstanding achievement in otolaryngology) Gillian R. Diercks

Titus Munson Coan Prize (best essay in biological sciences) Barry M. Fine

Thomas F. Cock Prize (excellence in obstetrics and gynecology) Hemashi K. Perera

Rosamond Kane Cummins’52 Award (graduate entering orthopedics with academic excellence, sensitivity, kindness, devotion to patients, and the fine human qualities she exemplified) David H. Wei

Dean’s Award for Excellence in Research, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at the medical center Christos A. Kyratsous, Yevgeniy B. Sirotin

Endocrine Society’s Medical Student Achievement Award Taison D. Bell

Daniel J. Fink, M.D., Memorial Prize (student who best exemplifies Dr. Fink’s enthusiasm for the study and practice of medicine) Mark D. Ewalt

Louis Gibofsky Memorial Prize Meghan E. Sise

Glasgow-Rubin Achievement Awards (presented to the women graduating first in their class) Katherine L. Carson, Gillian Diercks

Glasgow-Rubin Achievement Awards (presented to women students graduating in the top 10 percent of their class, in addition to the women graduating first) Catherine M. Albright, Rakhee M. Bowker, Kristina L. Casadei, Nancy L. Chen, Sarah W. Dennis, Sarah E. Goglin, Cathleen A. Greenzang, Kristine Y. Kay, Kristen E. Knoll, Genevieve S. London, Amy M. Lunding, Catherine A. Shu, Meghan E. Sise, Lauren S. Wasson, Janette I. Zuk

Gold Humanism Honor Society Taison Bell, Adeline Boatin, Kathleen Brennan, Katherine Carson, Kristina Casadei, Wen-I Wendy Chang, Nancy Chen, Abigail Chiverton, Jacob Doll, Elnaz Firoz, Hadi Halazun, Christopher Hale, Rebecca Hopkinson, Maya Hughes, Jordan Jacobs, Amy Lunding, Marc Manseau, Holly Martin, Kenneth Michelson, Hemashi Perera, Catherine Shu        , Lauren Wasson, David Wei

Dr. Charles F. Hamilton Award (excellence in pulmonary disease) Barry M. Fine

Izard Prize in Cardiology Neelesh L. Chudasama

Janeway Prize (the highest achievement and abilities in the graduating class) Meghan E. Sise

Jerry Jacobs Prize in Pediatrics Wen-I Wendy Chang

Albert B. Knapp Scholarship (awarded at the conclusion of the third year to medical students with the highest scholarship in the first three years) Katherine L. Carson, Michael J. Cutalo, Gillian R. Diercks

John K. Lattimer Prize in Urology (outstanding essay in urology) Jason Van Batavia

Barbara Liskin Memorial Award in Psychiatry (empathy, scholarship, and excellence exhibited by Barbara Liskin) Lindsey Y. Mortenson

Robert F. Loeb Award (excellence in clinical medicine) Barry M. Fine, Koushik K. Das

F. Lowenfish Prize In Dermatology (creative research in dermatology) Elnaz F. Firoz

Alfred M. Markowitz Endowment for Scholars (exemplifying Dr. Markowitz’s dedication to patient care, teaching, and scholarship) Vanessa L. Cowan

Dr. Cecil G. Marquez, B.A.L.S.O. Student Award (outstanding contribution to the Black and Latino Student Organization and the minority community) Taison D. Bell

Edith and Denton McKane Memorial Award (outstanding research in ophthalmology) Joann J. Kang

Medical Society of the State of New York Community Service Award Carl E. Fisher, Christopher S. Hale, Marc W. Manseau

Dr. Harold Lee Meierhof  Memorial Prize (outstanding achievement in pathology) Matthew C. Oliff

Drs. William Nastuk, Beatrice Seegal, and Konrad Hsu Award (for demonstrated successful laboratory collaboration between student and faculty) Jacob M. Appel, Jason A. Ellis

Marie Nercessian Memorial Award (exhibiting care, unusual concern, and dedication to helping sick people) Holly H. Martin

New York Orthopedic Hospital Award (outstanding performance in research and clinical work) Xavier G. Simcock

Outstanding Student in Family Medicine Award (for the student who demonstrates academic achievement in family medicine, has shown initiative in community health service, and has an understanding of and commitment to the principles of family medicine) Stephanie B. Long, Otibho A. Obianwu

Donald M. Palatucci Prize (awarded to a student in the fall of his/her fourth year who is in the upper one-third of the class, who exemplifies through activities in art, music, and literature that living and learning go together, and whose interactions with patients reflect kindness, humor, compassion, candor, and zest for life) Elnaz F. Firoz, Benjamin C. Kennedy

Joseph Garrison Parker Award (exemplifying through activities in art, music, literature, and the public interest that living and learning go together) Jacob A. Doll

Samuel W. Rover and Lewis Rover Awards for outstanding achievement in: Anatomy and Cell Biology — Li-Chun Cheng; Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics —  Brian R. Houck-Loomis; Genetics and Development — Yin Mei Lim

Drs. Robert A. Savitt and George H. McCormack Award (exemplifies Dr. McCormack’s medical skill, consideration, understanding, and compassion) Lauren S. Wasson

Rebecca A. Schwartz Memorial Prize (achievement in pediatric cardiology) Sarah W. Dennis

Helen M. Sciarra Prize in Neurology (outstanding achievement in neurology) Katherine L. Carson

Aura E. Severinghaus Scholar (superior academic achievement) Jordan V. Jacobs

Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Award (excellence in the specialty of emergency medicine) Rishi Madhok

Miriam Berkman Spotnitz Award (excellence in research of neoplastic diseases) Wassim M. Abida, Elizabeth M. Kass

Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award (excellence in science and compassion in patient care) Hadi Halazun

William Perry Watson Prize in Pediatrics (excellence in pediatrics) Cathleen A. Greenzang

Dr. William Raynor Watson Memorial Award (excellence in psychiatry throughout four years of medical school) Carl E. Fisher

Dr. Allen O. Whipple Memorial Prize (outstanding performance in surgery) David C. Woodland

Sigmund L. Wilens Prize (excellence in pathology) Katherine L. Carson

Students to be Recruited to New Columbia-Bassett Program
Bassett Campus Aerial View
P&S is establishing a clinical campus in upstate New York at Bassett Healthcare, a nationally recognized health system based in Cooperstown. P&S will expand its class size and offer 10 to 14 top-ranking students the opportunity to apply to the Columbia-Bassett Program.
     Students in this program will spend their first 18 months learning the basic science curriculum with the rest of their class in Manhattan, but their clinical training for the following two and a half years will be based at Bassett. The new model of medical training is designed to address the shortage of rural physicians and train a new generation of doctors capable of leading health systems that promote both quality and cost-effective delivery of care. Significant scholarship support will be available to students who are accepted.
     The Association of American Medical Colleges has called for a 30 percent increase in U.S. medical school enrollment by 2015 to address the nation’s physician shortage, which is especially severe in rural America. In New York, 25 percent of the state’s population lives in rural and poor inner city, medically underserved regions, while 91 percent of physicians in the state practice in urban counties. The Columbia-Bassett program responds to this need and, more recently, a call for the nation’s medical schools to explore ways to better equip physicians to deal with the health care needs of the 21st century.
     In a report released earlier this year, the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation recommends using this period of historic expansion in enrollment to advance the effectiveness of medical education and better align it with societal needs and expectations. The Chronicle of Higher Education characterized it as an opportunity to “update an outmoded physician-training model that has resulted in the wrong mix of people being trained in the wrong settings at too high a cost.”
Shown answering questions at a press conference after announcement
of the new Columbia-Bassett Program are, from left, Henry Weil’86,
Columbia’s assistant dean for education at Bassett Healthcare; Thomas Q.
Morris’58, chair of the Bassett Board of Trustees; P&S Dean Lee Goldman;
and Congressman Michael A. Arcuri (D-N.Y. 24th District).
     Bassett has been a teaching affiliate of P&S since 1947, serving as a site for medical student clinical rotations and postgraduate residency training.
     In announcing the Columbia-Bassett venture, Lee Goldman, M.D., executive vice president for health and biomedical sciences and dean of the faculties of health sciences and medicine at Columbia, said, “Our goal is to encourage outstanding medical students to practice in rural areas and help them develop the skills necessary to shape the health care systems of the future. This innovative new campus may be the demonstration model for a much-needed new paradigm, which will catalyze care that is at once safer and less costly and inspire other medical schools to emulate and improve upon our example.”
     Columbia and Bassett launched the program publicly at a May 11 event at Cooperstown. The program included remarks by Richard F. Daines, M.D., New York state’s health commissioner, and New York Congressman Michael A. Arcuri.
     The partnership with Bassett comes at time when Columbia is enhancing its educational model to be sure it continues to meet the demands of an increasingly challenging health care environment. The creation of a campus in upstate New York and the progressive curriculum in place at the Columbia-Bassett campus are consistent with that commitment. “This program provides two unique learning experiences,” says Ronald Drusin’66, vice dean for education at P&S. “The mission of the College of Physicians and Surgeons is to develop future leaders in patient care, research, education, and policy. The Bassett campus additionally provides students with learning opportunities in a rural setting with an emphasis on longitudinal patient relationships.”
     Henry Weil, M.D., Columbia’s assistant dean for education at Bassett Healthcare, says the goal of the Columbia-Bassett curriculum is to prepare skilled clinicians who are passionate about patient care, good communicators, adept at evidence-based medicine, and accountable to society as responsible managers of the health care system. Toward that end, students will be exposed to learning typically far-removed from the medical school experience, such as finance, risk management, patient safety, quality improvement, and medical informatics. Bassett’s advanced computer technology and an electronic medical record that links the Bassett network across 5,000 square miles will be a critical component of these curricular objectives. Dr Weil, a 1986 P&S graduate, says, “One of the building blocks of health care reform is training that nurtures the compassionate physician while simultaneously immersing that doctor in leadership development and the systems underpinning effective health care delivery. In this new era of medical education, physician training is not just about medicine and science.”
     The four-year program will graduate its first class in 2014. Bassett will be the host campus from the middle of the student’s second year until graduation. Students’ clinical experiences at Bassett’s Cooperstown campus will consist of a required one year experience followed by a year and a half of electives and pursuit of an area of concentration utilizing the full array of opportunities at both campuses. The curriculum will focus on the basic sciences at P&S in Washington Heights, followed by clinical training in a distinctive longitudinal program at Bassett. In contrast to most medical schools, where students have blocks of experiences, abandoning one set of patients for the next, Bassett students will care for patients over an extended span of time and have an opportunity to manage the care of individual patients over time and through different types of medical problems. They will get to know their patients as people and see a disease as a process, not a snapshot. Bassett also provides a unique opportunity to learn medicine at both the individual and the population level as it serves an entire region of New York state. “It is an integrated academic health system with a full-time faculty whose incentives are fully aligned with that of the hospital and health system,” says Dr. Drusin. “Students will thereby train in an environment of efficient and effective delivery of health care and where physicians and other practitioners fully collaborate to deliver the best care possible to both their individual patients and the population of the region. This is an important paradigm for how health care in the United States will need to evolve if we are to solve the many problems of our current system.”
     Walter Franck, M.D., Columbia’s senior associate dean for the Bassett affiliation and a 1964 P&S graduate, says the students who participate in the Columbia-Bassett program will experience all disciplines of clinical medicine, ranging from the broad spectrum of primary care to the wide variety of subspecialties in medicine. “Our goal is to educate them in excellent practice taught in a rural setting.”
     Applicants will be evaluated in accordance with Columbia’s rigorous academic standards with special emphasis placed on recruiting students from rural communities. Research has shown that recruitment and retention of rural physicians is most successful when it targets candidates who were raised in a rural community and have completed medical school and/or residency training in a similar environment.
     Each student who enrolls in the program will receive $30,000 per year in tuition support. “In the face of educational debt that can exceed $200,000, many young physicians must make career decisions based upon maximizing their earning potential. We want to make rural practice a more attractive and viable option by limiting future debt through substantial financial assistance,” says Dr. Weil.
     The Bassett Board of Trustees, chaired by Thomas Q. Morris’58, Alumni Professor Emeritus of Clinical Medicine, has committed the financial resources for scholarship support. “In making a commitment to support students in this new program, the Bassett Trustees are acknowledging the importance of Bassett’s affiliation with Columbia and our belief that the students we attract to this program will be vital to strengthening medical care in upstate New York. We are confident that both the unique experiences this program offers students and the reduction in their educational debt will help create a pipeline for future generations of physicians in this area of the state,” says Dr. Morris.
     P&S faculty are well represented on the Bassett Board of Trustees. In addition to Dr. Morris, the board includes Katherine G. Nickerson, M.D., associate professor of clinical medicine and vice chair of medical service operations and education for the Department of Medicine; Timothy A. Pedley, M.D., the Henry and Lucy Moses Professor of Neurology and chair of neurology; and Donald Quest’70, the J. Lawrence Pool Professor of Neurological Surgery and assistant dean for student affairs.

The P&S Office of Admissions will begin soon to recruit the additional students for the program. More information about the program is available at www.columbia-bassett.org.

A New Master of Science Degree in Narrative Medicine
Narrative medicine, an interdisciplinary field created at P&S in 2000 and since adopted by schools across the country, uses literature, literary theory, and creative writing to emphasize the importance of the patient story in health care — both the need for patients to tell their stories fully and for health care professionals to listen closely to the stories and how they are told.
     Columbia University’s Program in Narrative Medicine will launch a new master of science degree in narrative medicine beginning September 2009. The degree is sponsored by the Columbia School of Continuing Education in cooperation with the narrative medicine program. This interdisciplinary degree will be the first of its kind. Rita Charon, M.D., Ph.D., founder and director of the Program in Narrative Medicine at P&S and professor of clinical medicine, has assembled a core faculty from the medical center and the main campus of Columbia who, together, have conceptualized and will teach in the new degree program.
     The core curriculum will teach narrative theory, close reading, reflective writing, interpretation of illness narratives, narrative ethics, and the development of empathetic relationships between clinicians and patients. Intended to equip clinicians and scholars to develop, teach in, and direct narrative medicine programs, the graduate training also will emphasize skills in teaching narrative competence to clinicians, trainees, and patients in hospital and clinic settings and in evaluating their effectiveness. Other topics emphasized in the program include narrative genetics, narrative evidence-based medicine, clinical team-building and quality improvement through narrative methods, and caring at the end of life.
     Intended for health care professionals and trainees in a variety of disciplines, including medicine, nursing, dentistry, social work, physical therapy, occupational therapy, psychoanalysis, and pastoral care, the master’s degree program also will accept candidates trained in literary studies, creative writing, oral history, anthropology, and other social science or humanities disciplines who study illness narratives or educate health professionals. The program is exploring opportunities with the health professions schools of Columbia for offering combined or dual degrees.
     A February information session about the new degree attracted more than 200 people from fields including medicine, law, journalism, and the arts. Advance registration was so high that the event was moved from the Lerner Center to the Rotunda of Low Library to accommodate the size of the group of potential students.
Details about the new degree program can be found at www.narrativemedicine.org.

    NI Centennial
Save the dateFriday, Sept. 25, 2009 — to participate in the centennial celebration of the Neurological Institute of New York. NI will host a symposium from 8:30 a.m. until 5 p.m. in the P&S Alumni Auditorium, followed by a reception and dinner gala that night at 583 Park, an event space on Manhattan’s Upper East Side.
More information is available from the Special Events Office at CUMC’s Development Office by sending e-mail to LB2547@columbia.edu or calling 212-304-7210.
The Rachmaninoff Piano

By Peter Liou’12
Tucked away within a double-doored room in Bard
Hall overlooking the Hudson is a musical gem relatively unknown to people outside the Columbia community: a nine-foot Steinway piano once played by the legendary Russian pianist and composer Sergei Rachmaninoff. And unlike the pianos of Beethoven, Chopin, or Liszt, which are roped-off and carefully warded by museum security, the “Rachmaninoff Piano,” as it is fondly known to students at P&S, has played a vibrant role in the musical lives of faculty, students, and staff who have enjoyed the piano’s sound throughout its 80-year tenure at the medical school.
The Rachmaninoff Piano      But years of deterioration have rendered the Rachmaninoff piano unplayable. Last month, two of its legs and the pedal lyre snapped off under its own weight. It has a cracked soundboard and damaged pin block, two critical elements in a piano’s sound. Reaction across the medical center community was immediate: Representatives from the P&S Alumni Association, the Office of Student Affairs, the P&S Club, faculty from various departments, and students from the Musicians’ Guild organized a benefit concert on May 11 to help raise funds to repair the Rachmaninoff piano. The well-attended concert featured Marc Dickstein’87, associate professor of clinical anesthesiology, accompanied by students from the Musicians’ Guild for more than two hours of wonderful chamber and solo performances.
     The concert raised nearly $3,000 and demonstrated the astonishing love for music shared by so many throughout the Columbia community. Repairs for the Rachmaninoff piano — replacing the soundboard, attaching new legs, and installing an intrinsic humidifying system to prevent further damage — are expected to cost tens of thousands of dollars, so the fundraising effort will continue. But for all the priceless memories the piano has given to the generations of P&S students who have heard its voice, not only as a precious historical artifact but also as a symbol of the diverse talents that makes P&S unique, it is quite deserving of a full restoration. For now, the Rachmaninoff piano remains ensconced behind the double doors of the Clyde and Helen Wu Music Room in Bard Hall awaiting restoration to its former glory and the opportunity to bring magnificent music to students for many more generations to come.

For more information about the Rachmaninoff restoration and music at P&S, including maintenance of the music rooms and all pianos in Bard Hall, contact the P&S Club through Rosemarie Scilipoti at rs2914@columbia.edu or 212-304-7025.

In Nicaragua: Attacking Dengue Through Shoe Leather and Technology

By Aileen Chang’10
Editor’s Note: Aileen Chang is using her Doris Duke International Fellowship to help public health workers in Nicaragua.
Map of Bluefields, Nicaragua
I traveled to Nicaragua to work on a technology initiative for dengue fever, easily spread because the mosquito that carries the virus, Aedes Aegypti, is able to reproduce in every wash basin, old shoe, or coconut shell that holds water. The larvae grow silently around the homes in the overcrowded, impoverished cities of Nicaragua.
     Dengue is serious: Violently high fever for three to five days can progress to a hemorrhagic state with bruising, nose bleeds, vomiting of blood, and generalized bleeding from all organ systems. Uncontrolled bleeding can lead to shock, altered mental status, and death.
     As a P&S student, I am studying dengue outbreaks in Nicaragua while working with the non-profit Dengue Relief Foundation. When I received the Doris Duke International Fellowship from Columbia, I set out to implement a dengue surveillance system that I had started developing in my apartment in New York City. By mapping levels of mosquito infestation, the Nicaraguan Ministry of Health can prioritize control measures among the highest risk areas.
     We started in the Atlantic coast city of Bluefields, where the Caribbean beat of reggae pulses through crowded streets. Bluefields is rich in red snapper, shrimp, lobsters, and coconuts, but poor when it comes to everything else. Infectious disease is rampant because the city has no sewage system, no running water, and electricity in only a few areas. Bluefields has some of the highest incidences of HIV, malaria, and dengue in the entire country.
     I joined the public health workforce, called the “terrenos,” and trekked from home to home to survey levels of mosquito infestation. We overturned coconut shells, broken bottles, and even bottle caps so they would not collect water.
     Homes are mostly wooden planks nailed together with a sheet of aluminum for a roof. Garbage litters the ground around the homes because garbage trucks do not have access to many of the neighborhoods. The few roads have been destroyed by rain.
     Most families pump water from the public wells or store rain water in large barrels for bathing and drinking. This water is the preferred breeding site for Aedes Aegypti. Terrenos place spoonfuls of larvicide in the barrels, while others fumigate to kill adult mosquitoes. Most importantly, they explain to families what they can do to keep their homes safe from dengue.
     Every day for eight hours a day, terrenos travel door to door overturning as many coconut shells and educating as many people as possible. For my part, I adapted satellite images from Google Earth into epidemiologic mapping programs, and I worked with the terrenos to use the mapping system to identify the areas in greatest need of the limited resources remaining after budget cuts reduced money for gasoline to fumigate, for larvicides to treat water, and for salaries to pay public health workers. Bluefields is the first municipality of 152 locations in Nicaragua to use this system.

Since Ms. Chang wrote this, the financial situation in Nicaragua has grown more dire. Because of fraud in elections there, foreign aid was reduced. With no money for gasoline to help with fumigation, water, though less effective as an aerosol, is being used as the solvent. Reductions in the national budget have curtailed work hours to save electricity. Meanwhile, the number of houses in need of fumigation and water treatment for mosquito larva is great, and more cases of dengue are diagnosed each week.

Team Peej Supports Student with Brain Tumor

Paul “P.J.” Lukac, a second-year student, organized a large team — Team Peej — for April’s American Brain Tumor Association’s 5K run in Chicago. The team came together after he was diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor in December 2008.

     As P.J. writes on his blog (www.runpjrun.com), “I must have gotten this stupid brain tumor for a reason ...
probably to raise money and become a stellar doctor. Now I know without a doubt what field I’m supposed to enter. I have a gut feeling that I have a long life ahead of me. 20,000 [glioblastomas] are diagnosed each year. They are rare and underfunded, and they have such profound effects on patients, their families, and their friends. Let’s stop it.”
     P.J.’s classmates have rallied behind him, organizing a fundraising drive — selling grey elastic “Run PJ Run” wristbands. They also held a “Rock PJ Rock” benefit concert on April 20 in Bard Lounge, featuring performances by several student music groups, Class of 2011’s Toxic Megacolon, Class of 2012’s Inversus Situs, Alien Hand Syndrome, and the Ultrasounds.
     After Lisa Mellman, M.D., senior associate dean for student affairs, and Ron Drusin’66, vice dean for education, sent an e-mail about P.J. to the Columbia University Medical Center community, donations to the American Brain Tumor Association in P.J.’s name increased dramatically, and he raised his goal several times. The team at April’s run in Chicago had around 95 runners and raised approximately $55,000, the highest amount raised by any team participating in the event.
     Visit www.runpjrun.com to learn more about him or to donate in his name. Meanwhile, he is continuing his quest to become a neurooncologist, lining up a summer research position at Northwestern University to conduct glioma research. —Elizabeth Streich

Newest Members, Garvey Academy
The fourth class of Fellows chosen for the Glenda Garvey Teaching Academy has 10 P&S faculty members, one from the Mailman School of Public Health, and two from the College of Dental Medicine.

The Garvey Academy, named for Glenda Garvey’69, who taught students and residents in the Department of Medicine for 25 years before her death in 2004, now has 40 members. The Academy recognizes excellence, rewards achievement, and promotes innovation among faculty members from the four medical center schools.

The 13 newest members, chosen by a selection committee of faculty members, were chosen through a new standards-based process that judges applicants against published educational performance standards rather than in comparison with each other.

Joining the academy this year:
P&S:
Tracey D. Arnell, M.D., assistant professor of surgery; Deborah L. Cabaniss, M.D., associate clinical professor of psychiatry; Stephen M. Canfield, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of medicine; Elsa-Grace V. Giardina, M.D., professor of clinical medicine; Deepthiman Gowda, M.D., M.P.H., assistant clinical professor of medicine; Andrew Mutnick, M.D., assistant clinical professor of pediatrics; Katherine Nickerson, M.D., associate professor of clinical medicine; Constance M. Park, M.D., Ph.D., associate clinicalprofessor of medicine; Patrice F. Spitalnik, M.D., assistant professor of clinical pathology; and Olajide Williams, M.D., M.S., assistant professor of clinical neurology
Mailman School of Public Health: Bin Cheng, Ph.D., assistant professor of biostatistics
College of Dental Medicine: Margherita Santoro, D.D.S., M.A., associate professor of clinical dental medicine, and Candice Zemnick, D.M.D., M.P.H., M.S., assistant professor of clinical dental medicine
Residency Match 2009 (All are 2009 graduates unless noted)
Residency Match 2009 Residency Match 2009 Residency Match 2009 Residency Match 2009
PHOTO CREDIT: Dara Holder

ANESTHESIOLOGY

Kaliq Chang

Columbia

anesthesiology

Nicholas Davis

NY Hosp, Queens
Columbia

medicine-prelim
anesthesiology

Leon Freudzon

Columbia

anesthesiology

Cameron Marshall

Columbia

anesthesiology

Jennifer McDonald

Columbia

anesthesiology

Gene Yocum

Northwestern McGaw, Chicago
Columbia

medicine-prelim
anesthesiology

DERMATOLOGY

Erin Ducharme’07

Texas A&M-Scott &
White Healthcare

dermatology

Elnaz Firoz

Mount Sinai, NY Brown
Univ/Rhode Island Hosp

medicine-prelim
dermatology

Kristen Knoll

Mount Sinai, NY
NYU

medicine-prelim
dermatology

EMERGENCY MEDICINE

David Carbonell

Univ of North Carolina

Thomas Fralich

UCSF-Fresno

Andrew Hoene

Univ of Illinois

Kevin Lee

Mount Sinai, NY

Rishi Madhok

Columbia & Cornell

Brendan Norwood

Brigham & Women’s

Adedamola Ogunniyi’08

Harbor-UCLA

FAMILY MEDICINE

Stephanie Long

Family Medicine Residency of Idaho, Boise

Otibho Obianwu

Swedish Med Ctr, Seattle

INTERNAL MEDICINE

Wassim Abida

Univ of Pennsylvania

Graham Adsit

Univ of Wisconsin

Mona Akbari

Beth Israel Deaconess, Boston

Samuel Ash

Univ of Washington

Taison Bell

Massachusetts General

Andrew Bellinger

UCSF

Sandy Charles

Columbia

Neelesh Chudasama

Columbia

Koushik Das

Massachusetts General

Jacob Doll

Univ of Chicago

Darshan Doshi’08

Columbia

Lauren Edwards

UC San Diego

Barry Fine

Columbia

Patrick Fleming

Boston Univ

Sarah Goglin

UCSF

Hadi Halazun

Columbia

Shirin Hastings

Univ of Rochester/Strong Memorial

Robert Hiensch

Mount Sinai, NY

Christopher Johnson

Univ of Washington

Sunnie Kim

NYU

Lori Leslie

Columbia

Jacqueline Lonier

NYU

Amy Lunding

Yale-New Haven

Jonathan Mori

Stanford Univ

Vivian Ng

Columbia

Charles Resor

Columbia

Catherine Shu

Columbia

Meghan Sise

Massachusetts General

Tacara Soones

UCSF

David Tsay

Columbia

Lauren Wasson

Columbia

MEDICINE-PEDIATRICS

Benjamin Bodnar

Yale-New Haven

MEDICINE-PRIMARY CARE

Kristina Casadei

Univ of Pennsylvania

Erin Goss

Einstein/Montefiore

MEDICINE-PRELIM

Anthony Delmonte’08

Roger Williams Med Ctr, Rhode Island

Bonnie Koo

North Shore-LIJ Health System

Vivian Laquer

Harbor-UCLA

Shannon Watkins

Yale-New Haven

NEUROLOGY

Rachel Berkowitz

Weill Cornell

neurology

Katherine Carson

Columbia

medicine-prelim/ neurology

Kathy Chuang’06

Massachusetts General

neurology

Jeremy Ragland

St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hosp Columbia

medicine-prelim neurology

Marianna Shnayderman

St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hosp Columbia

medicine-prelim neurology

Rachel Ventura

NYU
Columbia

medicine-prelim neurology

Ting Zhou

Baylor
Univ of Pennsylvania

medicine-prelim neurology

NEUROSURGERY

Jason Ellis

Columbia

Matthew Garrett

UCLA

Benjamin Kennedy

Columbia

Maxwell Merkow

Univ of Pennsylvania

Charles Mikell

Columbia

David Weintraub

Univ of Virginia

OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY

Catherine Albright

Brown Univ/Women & Infants Hosp

Jennifer Amorosa

Columbia

Adeline Boatin

Brigham & Women’s

Jing Chen

Tufts Med Ctr

Rongrong Fan

Mountain Area Health Ed Ctr, Asheville, N.C.

Hemashi Perera

Columbia

Janette Zuk

NYU

OPHTHALMOLOGY

Joann Kang

Maimonides Med Ctr
Univ of Illinois

transitional
ophthalmology

Kristine Kay

New York Downtown Hosp
Weill Cornell

medicine-prelim
ophthalmology

Grace Richter

St. Mary Med Ctr,
Long Beach, Calif.
Univ of Southern California

medicine-prelim
ophthalmology

Ankoor Shah

Flushing Hosp
Univ of Pennsylvania/
Scheie Eye Institute

transitional
ophthalmology

Steven Williams

Newton-Wellesley
Hosp, Newton, Mass.
Tufts Med Ctr

transitional
ophthalmology

ORAL & MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY

David Alfi

Columbia

surgery-prelim

Aaron Park

Columbia

surgery-prelim

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY

Leslie Fink

Columbia

Brian Kelly

Massachusetts General

Stephen Klinge

Brown Univ/Rhode Island Hosp

Jonathan Packer‘08

Yale-New Haven

Peter Sculco

Hosp for Special Surgery

Xavier Simcock

Massachusetts General

George Vorys

Columbia

David Wei

Columbia

OTOLARYNGOLOGY

Gillian Diercks

Mass Eye and Ear Infirmary

PATHOLOGY

Ashleigh Allen

Columbia

Mark Ewalt

Columbia

Christopher Hale

NYU

Albert Su

UCLA

Arun Wiita

UCSF

PEDIATRICS

Rakhee Bowker

Columbia

Kathleen Brennan

Columbia

Talia Brooks

North Shore-LIJ Health System

Wen-I Chang

Columbia

Nancy Chen

UCSF

Abigail Chiverton

Children’s Hosp, Philadelphia

Johanna Delacroix

North Shore-LIJ Health System

Sarah Dennis

Einstein/Montefiore

Cathleen Greenzang

Univ of Washington

Maya Hughes

Univ of Washington

Robert Kavanagh

Children’s National Med Ctr, Washington, D.C.

Ellen Laves

UCSF

Genevieve London

Columbia

Kenneth Michelson

Children’s Hosp, Boston

PEDIATRICS-PRIMARY CARE

Holly Martin

UCSF

PHYSICAL MEDICINE & REHABILITATION

Elizabeth Nguyen

St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hosp
Columbia & Cornell

medicine-prelim
physical medicine & rehab

PSYCHIATRY

Frank Appah

Yale-New Haven

Jacob Appel

Mount Sinai, NY

Luke Archibald

NYU

Carl Erik Fisher

Columbia

Shannon Gulliver

Weill Cornell

Danella Hafeman

Univ of Pittsburgh

Keith Hermanstyne

UCSF

Rebecca Hopkinson

NYU

Sarah MacArthur

NYU

Marc Manseau

NYU

Lindsey Mortenson

Univ of Michigan

Meredith Naidorf

Yale-New Haven

Daniel Notzon

Columbia

Raymond Raad

Weill Cornell

Celia Rivera

Einstein/Montefiore

Margaret Shirley

UCSF

Brendon Watson

Weill Cornell

RADIATION ONCOLOGY

Scott Bratman

Calif Pacific Med Ctr,
San Francisco Stanford Univ

medicine-prelim
radiation oncology

RADIOLOGY-DIAGNOSTIC

Matthew Alexander

UCSF
Stanford Univ

surgery-prelim
radiology- diagnostic

Michael Cutalo

MacNeal Hosp,
 Berwyn, Ill.
Stanford Univ

transitional
radiology- diagnostic

Duncan Davidson

Sound Shore Med Ctr,
New Rochelle, N.Y.
Westchester Med Ctr,
Valhalla, N.Y.

medicine-prelim
radiology- diagnostic

Vesselin Miloushev

NYU
Columbia

medicine-prelim
radiology-diagnostic

Matthew Neimark

Staten Island Univ Hosp
SUNY Downstate,
Brooklyn

medicine-prelim
radiology- diagnostic

Matthew Oliff

Tufts Med Ctr
Brigham & Women’s

transitional
radiology- diagnostic

Olufoladare Olorunsola

Cedars-Sinai Med Ctr
UCSF

medicine-prelim
radiology- diagnostic

SURGERY-GENERAL

Jennifer Cabot

Beth Israel Deaconess, Boston

Cristina Carpio

Columbia

Vanessa Cowan

Columbia

Daniel Fish

Weill Cornell

Jordan Jacobs

St. Joseph’s Hosp, Phoenix

Deirdre Kelleher

Weill Cornell

Mark Maxfield

Yale-New Haven

John Pepen

Columbia

Elsa Pichardo

UMDNJ-Robt Wood Johnson,
Piscataway, N.J.

Abimbola Pratt

NY Methodist Hosp, Brooklyn

David Woodland

Columbia

SURGERY-PRELIM

Aderinmola Adewunmi

Morristown Memorial Hosp, N.J.

Amy Cheng

Kaiser Permanente, Pasadena, Calif.

Jon Roberts

Columbia

James Spencer’08

Beth Israel Deaconess, Boston

UROLOGY

Joshua Gonzalez

Mount Sinai, NY

surgery
prelim/urology

Martin Kathrins

Univ of Pennsylvania

surgery
prelim/urology

Melissa Laudano

Weill Cornell

surgery
prelim/urology

Miguel Mercado

Baylor

surgery
prelim/urology

Jason Van Batavia

Columbia

surgery
prelim/urology

 

| TOP |