51 1987
Helping Our Neighbors
64 1997
CAPNA
52 1989
New York’s Largest Hospital
65 December 31, 1997
Two Great Hospitals Become One
53 1990s
The Armory: A Transformation
66 1998
Public Health Gets New Name
54 1992
Clinical Trials
67 May 8, 1998
A New Psychiatric Institute
55 January 1993
Learning Center
68 1999
First Graduation for Dental Assistant Program
56 1993
First White Coat Ceremony
69 October 6, 2000
Dental Care for the Elderly
57 1993
Nursing School Admits Doctoral Students
70 October 9, 2000
Another Nobel!
58 September 30, 1993
A Home Plate for the Garden
71 November 2000
A New Children’s Hospital
59 1993
Pssst: Have You Heard About Alternative Medicine at P&S?
72 February 2001
Dental Outreach Hits the Road
60 1994
Powerful Imaging
73 Summer 2001
Pioneering New Technology
61 1995
Audubon Biomedical Science and Technology Park
74 October 2001
Residence Opens for Postdocs
62 1996
P&S Club Turns 100
75 October 2003
Same Place, New Name
63 December 1996
School-based Dentistry in Harlem

51 1987
Helping Our Neighbors
The Medical Center Neighborhood Fund was created in 1987 as a way for all Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center employees — those employed by Columbia University Health Sciences, the New York State Psychiatric Institute, and Presbyterian Hospital (now New York-Presbyterian Hospital at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center) — to set aside funds for grants to non-profit neighborhood organizations.
The first grants given — five $500 awards — seem small by today’s effort. Donations are made by payroll deductions or cash gifts. Amounts donated have increased nearly every year, reaching an all-time high of $80,500 donated in 2003 and given to 64 local organizations. Nearly $890,000 has been donated over the history of the fund. Many employees also donate their time to make site visits each year to organizations that apply for funding.
Only organizations outside the medical center and located in Community Board 12 are eligible for funding from the Neighborhood Fund. Little league teams, senior transportation services, museums with children’s workshops, public libraries, child care centers, beautification projects, arts outreach programs, and many other community programs receive grants from the fund. The university administers the fund without charge, so 100 percent of the money collected from medical center employees goes to neighborhood groups. Since 2000, the fund has given a special award to a non-profit organization to honor the memory of Donald F. Tapley, former dean of P&S and founder of the Neighborhood Fund.
52 1989
New York’s Largest Hospital
When the Milstein Hospital Building of Presbyterian Hospital opened on Nov. 16, 1989, it pushed the hospital’s capacity to 1,485 beds, making it the largest hospital in New York City and the second largest in the nation. A gift of $25 million from the Milstein Family Foundation launched construction of the building. The gift was, at the time, the largest single gift to the hospital in its 120-year history. Milstein features 10 floors of patient rooms, state-of-the-art operating rooms, radiological suites, and intensive care units. The escalator system linking all floors was a first of its kind in an American hospital. The Milstein Foundation was led at the time by Seymour and Paul Milstein and their sister, Gloria Flanzer.
53
The armory in the early 1990s (top) and as it appears today
1990s
The Armory: A Transformation
Built in 1909, the Armory has been in the neighborhood longer than the medical center. It is associated with different memories for different generations of Health Sciences students. During World War II, medical and dental students drilled in the Armory as enrollees in the Army Specialized Training Program or the Navy’s similar V-12 program.
The armory was one of many armories built in New York City between 1840 and 1940 as drill halls and militia offices. The facility at 168th Street and Fort Washington Avenue was the Armory for the 102nd Regiment Engineers. It was turned into a track and field center and a venue for many of the city’s biggest events after it was decommissioned in the 1920s. In the 1960s, the Armory was the unrivaled center for track & field competitions in greater New York. It had many other uses too: dog shows in the 1960s, bike races and tennis tournaments in the 1950s, and a medical center nursery school benefit ball in 1961, to name a few. The economic crises of the 70s and the homelessness problem of the 1980s brought a conversion of the Armory into a homeless shelter with more than 1,800 beds. By 1987, New York track & field was gone from the site.
For medical center students of the 1980s, the Armory became associated with crime, drug and alcohol use, and untreated mental illnesses. That changed in the early 1990s when the number of homeless housed in the Armory was reduced to about 200 men who are being treated for mental illness and drug addiction. Today’s graduates will remember the Armory as home of the National Track & Field Hall of Fame. The building has a six-lane 200-meter track, the fastest track in the Northeast, with an Olympic-quality surface. The Armory is now a hub of activity for students and adults from throughout New York City and the surrounding area, once again a proud neighbor to the medical center.
54 1992
Clinical Trials
Columbia Health Sciences and Presbyterian Hospital established a joint clinical trials office in 1992 to help researchers attract, negotiate, and conduct clinical trials and to match industry, government, and foundation research sponsors with researchers.
One of the first clinical trials offices in the United States, the Office of Clinical Trials quickly became one of the most successful and most often replicated offices throughout the world. In 1997, for example, the University of Hong Kong chose to base its clinical trials program on CPMC’s after surveying 300 programs throughout
the world.
The office expanded over the years. The number of clinical trials, the revenues derived from clinical trials grants and contracts, and the number of sponsors (government, industry, foundations) all rose significantly. In the first three months of the office, 30 contracts were developed. Eleven years later, the office has developed more than 1,500 clinical trials agreements with a value approaching $300 million.
The office also developed the Clinical Trials Network, an innovative clinical trials organization formed by Columbia University and New York-Presbyterian Hospital and Healthcare System. The network connects more than 15,000 physicians and a diversity of patients to the facilities and intellectual capabilities of the hospitals, hospital- or community-based ambulatory care sites, and physician practice groups in the New York-Presbyterian system and the two medical schools.
55
January 1993
Learning Center
A Student Learning Center was dedicated on the 17th floor of the Presbyterian Hospital Building in January 1993. The 26,000-square-foot facility is part classroom, part electronic library, and part student union. It provides teaching and learning space, computer and audiovisual equipment, and a lounge with vending machines.Two rooms are designated as computer areas, but the entire learning center is laced with a high-speed telecommunications network. Three microscopy labs are used by medical and dental students. The center also includes demonstration areas, conference rooms, and lockers for microscope storage.
56
Dr. Sandra Gold helps Patrice Alves’97 with his new white coat at the first ceremony in 1993
1993
First White Coat Ceremony
Today, thousands of students starting medical school throughout the United States and several places throughout the world are “cloaked” in their first white coat as they begin their medical education, thanks to a program that started at P&S in 1993. The Arnold P. Gold Foundation started the White Coat Ceremony as an annual rite of passage for doctors-to-be to pledge a commitment to the compassionate practice of medicine. Students also recite the Hippocratic oath, previously recited only at graduation from medical school, as a promise to uphold its tenets from the beginning of medical school. These ceremonies help students start thinking and feeling like a doctor from day one. White coat ceremonies have since become tradition at more than 130 American schools of medicine and osteopathy, at Israel’s four medical schools, and at schools in other countries. The Arnold P. Gold Foundation was established in 1988 by Drs. Arnold and Sandra Gold, several colleagues at P&S, and other dedicated community leaders and philanthropists to foster humanism in medicine through the White Coat Ceremony and other innovative programs including a ceremony that marks the transition of medical students from pre-clinical to clinical years. Dr. Arnold Gold is professor of clinical neurology and clinical pediatrics at P&S.
57 1993
Nursing School Admits Doctoral Students
The New York area’s first Doctor of Nursing Science (D.N.Sc.) degree was developed by the School of Nursing in the early 1990s and the first students were admitted in 1993-94.
“Columbia has long been a national leader in educating nurses for advanced clinical practice,” said School of Nursing Dean Mary O. Mundinger. “Now, we are expanding that tradition of excellence by preparing graduates at the doctoral level who are not only clinical experts but authorities in policy
matters as well.”
Jinah Shin was the first graduate of the program, in 1999. Eleven other students have graduated from the program, which now has 42 students.
The D.N.Sc. degree is a research doctorate, roughly the equivalent of a Ph.D. In 2003, the School of Nursing is seeking University approval of the first doctorate of clinical nursing.
58
September 30, 1993
A Home Plate for the Garden
In the early part of the 20th century, the land now occupied by Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center was Hilltop Park, the home of the Highlanders, the first American League team in New York. The Highlanders became the New York Yankees after leaving Hilltop.
In 1912, the Highlanders moved to the Polo Grounds, where they shared the stadium with the Giants until 1923 while Yankee Stadium was being built. Hilltop was demolished in 1914 and replaced by the one-story tabernacle of Billy Sunday, a baseball player turned evangelist. The tabernacle was later demolished to make way for the medical center.
Highlander pitcher Chet Hoff, at 102 years old, returned to his old stadium grounds on Sept. 30, 1993, to dedicate a bronze plaque from the New York Yankees. The plaque, in the shape of home plate, is placed in the garden in the approximate spot where home plate was located. Mr. Hoff died five years later at the age of 107.
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59 1993
Pssst: Have You Heard About Alternative Medicine at P&S?
When Richard and Hinda Rosenthal helped P&S form a center for alternative/complementary medicine in 1993, the keepers of P&S traditions raised eyebrows. Although the center has its detractors still, it has gained acceptance among faculty and students as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) reach mainstream status in American society. Even the federal government — typically not an early adapter — started exploring the state and efficacy of CAM, establishing the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine in the NIH.
The P&S center, since renamed the Rosenthal Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, is considered part of the school’s open-minded but skeptical approach to all things complementary and alternative. The mission of the Rosenthal Center is “to facilitate and conduct rigorous scientific investigation to evaluate the effectiveness, safety, and mechanisms of action of alternative and complementary remedies and practices.”
“Creation of the Rosenthal Center made it acceptable for people to discuss their interests,” says Dr. Fredi Kronenberg, director of the center and professor of clinical physiology (in rehabilitation medicine). “Certainly, some think this is a waste of time and resources, but the majority are in the middle, saying, ‘We’re good scientists; show us the data.’”
The Rosenthal Center will celebrate its 10th anniversary in November 2003. “We’ve come a long way, from faculty afraid to have us put on paper the work they were doing to a situation where we now have investigators calling to discuss research opportunities,” says Dr. Kronenberg. “As the funding has increased, so have those interested in conducting the research needed to develop the evidence base that so many are anxiously awaiting.”
60
Dr. Sadek Hilal as construction workers install the magnet for the world’s most powerful MRI
1994
Powerful Imaging
A 25-ton donut-shaped magnet for the world’s most powerful magnetic resonance imager for human research arrived in June 1994 after a week-long journey from Livermore, Calif., on a flatbed truck. The magnet was lowered by crane into CPMC’s specially built Hatch MRI research facility. A temporary wall was removed to accommodate the magnet’s installation, which followed nine years of research and development by Dr. Sadek K. Hilal, director of neuroradiology then, and other Columbia researchers. “This is my dream,” said Dr. Hilal, who took pictures of the magnet’s arrival and had his picture taken with the magnet. “It will allow us to study various components of the body with a magnetic strength that nobody has been able to research before.”
Dr. Hilal was professor emeritus of radiology (in neurological surgery) when he died Dec. 24, 2000. He was one of a handful of people considered to be the most influential in advancing imaging science and radiology during the past 50 years. Dr. Hilal had been director of the neuroradiology division since 1979. He received his M.D. degree from the University of Cairo and his Ph.D. degree from the University of Minnesota. His Ph.D. thesis, “The Measurement of Blood Flow by Radiologic Technique,” was one of the most cited references in radiology, according to the journal Radiology. A series of advances earned him an international reputation. Among these were the development of a microdensitometer to measure cerebral blood flow and use of a magnet to perform the first externally guided arterial catheterization inside the human brain. This led to endovascular therapy for aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations and was a forerunner to the field of neurointerventional radiology.
61
Ribbon-cutting at the Lasker Building
1995
Audubon Biomedical Science and Technology Park
The first building in the Audubon Biomedical Science and Technology Park opened in 1995. The building, named the Mary Woodard Lasker Biomedical Research Building, houses biotechnology companies. The facility is an incubator for new start-up biotechnology and biomedically related companies, part of the city’s effort to attract its share of the multi-billion dollar biotechnology industry.
The second building, the Russ Berrie Medical Science Pavilion, opened in 1997 as an academic building. The 175,000-square-foot building was the first dedicated research facility constructed on the Health Sciences campus since the Hammer Health Sciences Center was completed in the mid-1970s. It has labs for Columbia researchers, including the Columbia Genome Center, and clinical facilities, including the Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center and the Associates in Internal Medicine practice.
The Audubon Ballroom, designed by noted New York theater architect Thomas W. Lamb, opened in 1912. When the research park construction began on the site, the city preserved and restored a portion of the ballroom.
62 1996
P&S Club Turns 100
As the official student activities organization of P&S, the P&S Club serves as an axis around which extracurricular lives of students revolve. Some clubs within the P&S Club have been around for many years: Bard Hall Players, the Rugby Football Club, and the Walker Percy Society. Others are more recent additions: the Bulls and Bears Investment Club, the Faith and Medicine Discussion Group, and the Pediatric Interest Group.
Founded by Nobel Peace laureate John Mott, the club started as a student chapter of the YMCA when the college was located on 59th Street. In 1904, the “P&S Y,” as it was then known, purchased property at 328 W. 56th St. The association began to provide meals to students, and by 1910 it was sponsoring such activities as a Bible study group, a band, free medical exams for Boy Scouts, and a rooming referral service for students from out of town.
By 1911, the P&S Y, with 125 members, had decided to change its name to reflect its increasingly independent status and now called itself the “P&S Club.” When P&S moved to Washington Heights in 1928, the P&S Club moved with it, taking possession of new quarters at 100 Haven Avenue. The club moved to Bard Hall when it opened in 1931.
P&S Club activities are run entirely by students guided by a faculty advisory board.
63 December 1996
School-based Dentistry in Harlem
The School of Dental and Oral Surgery and members of the community celebrated the opening of the first Harlem school-based Columbia Community DentCare Network Clinic at Intermediate School 136. The DentCare program is a partnership between Columbia and the northern Manhattan community to get ahead of oral diseases by preventing them. Columbia dentists, hygienists, and dental assistants provide services in seven public school clinics.
64 1997
CAPNA
When Presbyterian Hospital asked Dr. Mary O. Mundinger, dean of the School of Nursing, to expand primary care to underserved communities in Upper Manhattan, she asked for something in return: hospital admitting privileges for the nurse practitioners staffing the community practices. The result: Nursing faculty became the first among the nation's advanced practice nurses to form a group practice with full admitting privileges to a major teaching hospital. Columbia Advanced Practice Nurse Associates now has two locations — 595 Madison Avenue and 617 W. 168th St.
Advanced practice nurses provide primary care by diagnosing and treating illness, referring patients to specialists as needed, and stabilizing emergency conditions. They co-manage hospital care in collaboration with a specialist. CAPNA is fully covered as a primary care provider by major insurance companies and Medicare. Yearly visits increased to 1,700 in 2002.
65

December 31, 1997
Two Great Hospitals Become One
New York Hospital and Presbyterian Hospital, two of the nation’s premier teaching hospitals, merged to form a single entity known as New York and Presbyterian Hospital. (Its name was later changed to New York-Presbyterian Hospital.) The merger created one of the largest and most comprehensive health-care facilities in the world and the largest in New York City.
Speaking about what this merger would mean for New Yorkers, Dr. David B. Skinner, vice chairman and CEO of New York and Presbyterian Hospital, said at the time: “We are combining the best practices of our hospitals and creating a new entity that will further improve the quality of health care delivered to our patients, enhance the availability of our clinical services to an expanded patient population, and lower the cost of these services through improved efficiencies.”
Dr. William T. Speck, president and chief operating officer at the time, described the merger as a “voyage of opportunity,” adding, “Presbyterian and New York Hospital chose to develop centers of excellence in different areas of medicine, so our coming together in a merger really does establish a completeness that’s unparalleled.”
Presbyterian had the nation’s largest heart transplant program, an NIH-designated comprehensive cancer center, and a Level 1 pediatric trauma center. New York Hospital had the country’s busiest burn center, a New York state-designated AIDS center, and a Level 1 adult trauma center. The merger made New York-Presbyterian Hospital one of only three medical centers in the United States with both Level 1 adult and Level 1 pediatric trauma centers.
The merged hospital has academic affiliations with two leading medical schools. New York Hospital had been the principal teaching hospital of Cornell Medical College (now the Weill Medical College of Cornell University) and Presbyterian Hospital was the principal teaching hospital of Columbia’s College of Physicians & Surgeons. The two renowned medical colleges remain separate corporate entities.
Today, New York-Presbyterian Hospital is one of the most comprehensive university hospitals in the world, with leading specialists
in every field of medicine. With total revenues of $1.977 billion, 13,304 full-time employees, and 4,717 physicians, the hospital records 854,496 outpatient visits, 177,994 emergency visits, and 47,284 ambulatory surgeries each year. The hospital has 2,395 beds and annually has 100,743 discharges, 685,467 inpatient days, and 13,593 deliveries.
New York-Presbyterian Hospital developed the New York-Presbyterian Healthcare System, which serves residents of Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx, Westchester, Long Island, New Jersey, Connecticut, and several upstate New York counties. Members of the system include acute-care and community hospitals, continuum-of-care facilities, home-health agencies, ambulatory sites, and specialty institutes committed to providing high-quality, cost-effective, and conveniently accessible care to the communities they serve. Each member of the system is an affiliate of either P&S or Cornell’s Weill Medical College.




66 1998
Public Health Gets New Name
Columbia’s School of Public Health, in 1998, was the recipient of the largest donation ever made to a public health school. The Mailman Foundation, a family-run foundation that supports institutions concerned with child welfare, education, and the environment, gave $33 million to the School of Public Health to support faculty, students, and the school’s public health programs and research. In recognition of the landmark gift, Columbia President George Rupp announced the renaming of the school as the Mailman School of Public Health of Columbia University.
“The school is forever indebted to the Mailman family for its extraordinary generosity, which so clearly demonstrates its belief and support of our public health mission,” says Dr. Allan Rosenfield, dean.
“When our family learned the scope of the school’s work in community health, we became intrigued with the possibility of helping it do more,” said Jody Wolfe, daughter of the late Joseph Mailman, in 1998.
Joseph L. Mailman, with his brother, Abraham, formed the Utica Knife and Razor Company, the Pal Blade Company, and later the Mailman Corporation, one of the earliest conglomerates in North America. During his career, Mr. Mailman was president of the Persona Blade Company and the British Rubber Company and chairman of the board of Air Express International. He was successful in raising funds for many philanthropic organizations, including the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies. Mr. Mailman actively assisted families fleeing Nazi Germany. He died in 1990 leaving a legacy of philanthropic commitment to his family, which runs the Mailman Foundation.
“We are immensely proud of our new name,” said Dr. Rosenfield in 1998. “This gift will strengthen the institution’s endowment and increase the visibility of the School of Public Health and its mission among health professionals, the general public, and the philanthropic community. It will also ensure our continued leadership on the many health policy issues of such great importance to communities and individuals in our country and throughout the world.”
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67 May 8, 1998
A New Psychiatric Institute
Leaders of the New York State Psychiatric Institute cut the ribbon on a new state-of-the-art research, teaching, and patient care facility on May 8, 1998. The building at 1051 Riverside Drive sits across the street to the west from the building the state erected in 1929 at the west end of 168th Street.
The six-story, 312,000-square-foot facility has an atrium that divides the building into two parts. Labs are located in the north part and inpatient care, outpatient clinics, and educational facilities are in the south part of the building. Two enclosed bridges connect the building to the institute’s Kolb Annex and the Milstein Hospital Building.
The Mailman School of Public Health and other Health Sciences offices moved into the old PI building.
68 1999
First Graduation for Dental Assistant Program
The School of Dental and Oral Surgery and Harlem Hospital Dental Service graduated the first 20 students of the Community DentCare Network’s Dental Assistant Training Program. Thanks to the support of the Upper Manhattan Empowerment Zone Development Corporation, this model program has served to strengthen the local economy by offering valuable job training and placement to local minority high school graduates and GED holders.
“The program’s greatest strength is the partnership between SDOS and Harlem Hospital Dental Service, which utilizes both faculty and facilities to offer the highest level of training to these students,” said Dr. Allan Formicola, dean of the School of Dental and Oral Surgery at the time. “The students also receive practical experience working alongside Columbia and Harlem practitioners.”
The graduates are residents of Harlem and Washington Heights/Inwood communities who receive one year of dental assistant training tuition-free. Graduates are placed in community clinics and private dental offices where they earn competitive salaries as state-certified dental assistants.
69 October 6, 2000
Dental Care for the Elderly
Ground was broken Oct. 6, 2000, for a Columbia School of Dental and Oral Surgery primary care center for the elderly, the first developed by a dental school. The 5,000-square-foot health center, located in the Mannie L. Wilson Towers at 124th Street and Manhattan Avenue in Harlem, combines comprehensive oral and medical primary health care services to the elderly and their families.
The center opened in June 2002 as the Thelma C. Davidson Adair Medical/Dental Center. Dr. Adair is a community and church leader, educator, public speaker, and writer who has lived in Harlem for more than 50 years. She works with Columbia and Harlem Hospital to promote programs and initiatives aimed at improving the quality of life in her community.
The facility offers dental care (exams, cleanings, sealants, dentures, and other services) plus internal medicine, health, and disease prevention programs, smoking cessation programs, and health education.
70 October 9, 2000
Another Nobel!
Eric Kandel and his wife, Denise, at one of many receptions held after he received a Nobel Prize in 2000
An impromptu celebration and press conference were held in the Alumni Auditorium Oct. 9, 2000, to honor Dr. Eric Kandel, University Professor, hours after he was informed that he was among three researchers to share the 2000 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. The phone call came at 5:15 a.m. “My wife handed me the phone and said, ‘Stockholm is calling.’”
Recognized for his pioneering work to understand the molecular basis of memory, Dr. Kandel shared the award with Dr. Arvid Carlsson of the University of Goteborg, Sweden, and Dr. Paul Greengard of Rockefeller University. “This is not a moment one prepares for,” Dr. Kandel addressed the packed auditorium after receiving a standing ovation. “I feel very privileged and humbled.”
Dr. Kandel is renowned for his work with the sea slug Aplysia, which has demonstrated fundamental ways in which nerve cells alter their responsiveness to chemical signals to produce a coordinated change in behavior. The work has been essential not only for the understanding of the basic processes of learning and memory, but also for highlighting many of the cellular processes that are targets of psychoactive drugs.
Born in Vienna in 1929, Dr. Kandel was educated at Harvard College and New York University School of Medicine. He began his research career at the National Institute of Mental Health, where he studied mammalian brain neurophysiology.
Dr. Kandel came to Columbia University in 1974 as professor of physiology and psychiatry, beginning his directorship of the newly formed Center for Neurobiology and Behavior shortly thereafter. Dr. Kandel became University Professor in 1983 and a Hughes Senior Investigator in 1984.
Dr. Kandel was the first person at P&S to win the Nobel Prize as a member of the faculty since 1956, when the prize was shared by Drs. André F. Cournand and Dickinson W. Richards.
71 November 2000
A New Children’s Hospital
A dozen children ages 5 to 10 used toy bulldozers to break ground on construction of the Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York at New York-Presbyterian Hospital.
A parking lot adjacent to the existing Children’s Hospital at 165th and Broadway is the site for the new 250,000-square-foot facility. The hospital is expected to open Nov. 12, 2003. The Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital and the pediatric service of New York Weill Cornell Medical Center of New York-Presbyterian will be collectively known as the Children’s Hospital of New York.
More than 300 Morgan Stanley employees contributed $55 million-plus toward the construction. The existing building will be renovated for expanded outpatient services and research and diagnostic services. The youngsters who participated in the ceremony were either former patients of the hospital or children of hospital or Morgan Stanley employees.
72 February 2001
Dental Outreach Hits the Road
A ribbon-cutting ceremony in February 2001 launched a state-of-the-art mobile dental care unit, sponsored by the School of Dental and Oral Surgery’s Community DentCare Network and the Children’s Aid Society. The Mobile Dental Center is equipped to take comprehensive diagnostic, preventive, and restorative dental care to pre-school children in low-income neighborhoods of northern Manhattan, including Washington Heights/Inwood and Harlem.
The new van will travel to HeadStart Centers, family day care centers, and elementary school programs to provide direct on-site dental service to an estimated 3,500 children.
The Columbia University Community DentCare Network is a collaboration of the School of Dental and Oral Surgery, Harlem Hospital, and community-based organizations in the Washington Heights/Inwood and Harlem communities. It provides full dental services to the underserved, training for community-based dental practitioners and dental hygienists, and preventive dental care for HIV/AIDS patients.
73 Summer 2001
Pioneering New Technology
In the largest personal digital assistant (PDA) initiative on the Health Sciences campus, the School of Nursing in 2001 provided first-year students in the BS/MS program the Palm Pilot 500m as a required tool of their training. Hot off the assembly line from Palm Inc., the students used the latest version of the company's hand-held devices to look up drug and infectious disease information and to digitally record their supervised care of patients.
The impetus for the program is three-fold: reduce medical errors and increase evidence-based practice; encourage students, early in their training, to track interventions using standardized nursing terminology to examine their practice; and facilitate preceptor monitoring of student clinical activity.
On their 500m, students fill in an electronic form for a nursing diagnosis, which can range from the need to educate a patient about drugs to noting a patient experiencing acute pain. They also record their interventions, such as teaching about medication or their administration of pain controllers.
Better documentation of nursing activity can lead to more research into the outcomes of nursing care and to appropriate reimbursement of nursing services.
74 October 2001
Residence Opens for Postdocs
Columbia opened a residence for postdocs at 390 Fort Washington with a ribbon cutting in October 2001. Built from scratch, the 12-story building has 46 apartments — 36 studios and 10 one-bedroom apartments.
The residence is the first new housing constructed at the Columbia Health Sciences since the 1970s. From 1930 through the early 70s, Bard Hall was the only residential building on campus. Additional housing did not come on line until the construction of the Bard-Haven Towers, which opened in 1971.
Even with the new building in Washington Heights and other housing arrangements, the demand for housing by CPMC students, postdocs, and faculty far exceeds the supply.
Postdoc research scientists are typically in the last stage of their training. They work with mentors at Columbia before beginning independent research. In recruiting postdocs to New York, faculty say, the first questions they hear are “Where will I live and how will I pay for it?”
75

October 2003
Same Place, New Name
Columbia’s medical, dental, public health, and nursing schools have been collectively organized as the University’s Health Sciences Division for many years, although Health Sciences Division has little meaning in the public vernacular. As of October 2003, the name changes to Columbia University Medical Center.
The new name provides maximum positive recognition for research, education, and clinical care offered by Columbia’s faculty and students, and it ties the four schools more closely to the University while leveraging the stature and value of the Columbia University name. It also reduces public confusion about the hospital, which changed names after merging with New York Hospital and now has affiliations with — and hospital campuses near — both Columbia and Cornell medical schools.
“Improving the way we are identified and perceived is necessary in moving forward with the strategic plan for the 168th Street campus,” says Dr. Gerald D. Fischbach, executive vice president for health and biomedical sciences. “Being known as Columbia University Medical Center is essential to facilitating our growth and maintaining our continued success.”

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