26 1956
The Nobel Prize
39 1978-2000
Allan Formicola
27 1957-1991
Libby Wilcox: Photographer and Historian
40 1980
Bayh-Dole Act
28 1963
Rh Disease
41 1981
A Murder on Campus
29 1965
Child Neurology
42 1981
Advisers by Any Name
30 1965
An Assassination Across the Street
43 1982
What’s Old is New Again
31 November 9, 1965
Darkness, then Light
44 1984
A Degree of Thanks
32 October 20, 1967
Celebrating 200 Years of P&S
45 June 9, 1984
Heart Transplant History
33 1968
BALSO
46 1984
Lou and Eleanor Gehrig
34 1970
Blessings Multiplied
47 1984
Maxwell Hall: Gone But Not Forgotten
35 mid-1970s
Students Remember First “Teachers”
48 1985
Home Health Guides
36 1977
Expanding Health-Care Opportunities for the Community
49 1984/1986
The Howard Hughes Legacy at Columbia
37 1979
Alan Alda’79 (Hon)
50 1986
Women as Department Leaders
38 1980s, 1990s, and On
Herbert and Florence Irving

26 1956
The Nobel Prize
Fame visited P&S, as it had before and would again, in the form of the Nobel Prize, awarded to Dr. André F. Cournand and Dr. Dickinson W. Richards, a 1923 P&S graduate, for their body of work that answered fundamental questions about the mechanics of the heart and the lung.
Drs. Richards and Cournand, who began working together on Columbia’s service at Bellevue Hospital in 1931 using equipment borrowed from Presbyterian Hospital, will be remembered best for their use of catheters to study the heart and lungs. During 1940 and 1941, the doctors recorded 30 successful catheterizations on human hearts.
27 1957-1991
Libby Wilcox: Photographer and Historian
Elizabeth “Libby” Wilcox used her camera the way a writer uses words, and she and her camera produced the equivalent of a multi-volume encyclopedia of some of the most important decades of medical center history. When she died May 6, 2000, she left a legacy that includes more than 100,000 photographic images of people, places, and events at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center.
In 1991, Mrs. Wilcox and her husband, the late Herbert B. Wilcox’34, donated her collection of negatives, contact sheets, prints, and photo stories to Columbia.
Her photos appeared in Time, Newsweek (including a cover photo), Life, Ladies Home Journal, Parents, Saturday Evening Post, and other national publications. — From In Memoriam, Fall 2000, P&S
28 1963
Rh Disease
Amniocentesis was performed in Dr. Vincent Freda’s Rh Antepartum Clinic in more than 200 cases in 1963 without fetal or maternal mishap. He and Dr. John G. Gorman discovered that if an Rh-negative woman was given an injection of the substance that causes Rh disease, her body would not attack the blood cells of the fetus. Their work led to the development of RhoGAM, an antibody that allows women who have Rh-negative blood to deliver healthy babies. Dr. Freda introduced amniocentesis into the United States in 1959 for the spectrophotometric scanning of amniotic fluid in cases of Rh incompatability. In 1964 Dr. Freda was the first physician in the world to perform surgery on a fetus.
Dr. Freda, left, and Dr. Gorman
29 1965
Child Neurology
The first training program in child neurology was established in 1965 by Dr. Sidney Carter, professor emeritus of neurology and pediatrics, who received the first NIH Pediatric Neurology Training Grant.
Dr. Carter joined the P&S faculty in 1948 and became the third chief of pediatric neurology at the Neurological Institute. Dr. Bernard Sachs and others in the 1930s gave birth to pediatric neurology as a new area of expertise. The new discipline was nurtured in the Neurological Institute’s Division of Child Neurology, the nation’s first such service devoted to children. Dr. Sachs identified beds where children would be treated separately from adults by both pediatricians and child neurologists. Dr. Carter built on this progress by establishing training and certification guidelines. He was instrumental in the 1968 decision by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology to grant certification in pediatric neurology.
30
Betty Shabazz at a 1995 Malcolm X Scholars luncheon
1965
An Assassination Across the Street
African-American activist Malcolm X, born Malcolm Little, was in prison in the 1940s when he became a follower of Elijah Muhammad, the leader of the Nation of Islam. The Nation of Islam gave him the name Malcolm X. After prison he founded mosques in Boston, Philadelphia, Harlem, and elsewhere.
A television special in 1959, reported by Mike Wallace, brought public prominence to Malcolm X and the Nation of Islam, also known as the Black Muslim movement. Speeches, newspaper columns, and radio and TV interviews furthered his prominence. He left the movement in 1964 to form parallel organizations that encouraged African-Americans to use their voting privileges to effect change. He was considered influential among black youths and traveled widely for his cause, moving closer to the civil rights movement.
Malcolm X was assassinated on Feb. 21, 1965, as he addressed supporters at the Audubon Ballroom.
His widow, Betty Shabazz, became an educator, civil rights advocate, and friend of the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. She helped the Health Sciences when the University, along with the city and state of New York, began plans to develop the Audubon Biomedical Science and Technology Park on the site of the Audubon Ballroom. Dr. Shabazz proposed a living memorial, which became the Malcolm X Medical Scholarships for minority medical students enrolled at Columbia. She joined the Columbia-Presbyterian Health Sciences Advisory Council in 1991 and was an active participant in advisory council meetings.
Dr. Shabazz died at age 61 in June 1997 from injuries suffered in a fire in her home.
31
First floor of Vanderbilt Clinic during the 1965 blackout
November 9, 1965
Darkness, then Light
When the power went out throughout New York, New England, and parts of Ontario in 1965, the medical center was in darkness for only eight seconds, when the emergency generator came on to provide essential patient services. The blackout lasted 12 hours. Years later, in July of 1999, intense summer heat caused a blackout in the medical center’s Washington Heights neighborhood. That blackout affected Columbia-Presbyterian even more than the neighborhood. The neighborhood was without electricity for about 19 hours, but full electrical service was not restored to medical center facilities until nearly three days after the blackout began. Hardest hit by the power failure was the research program’s refrigerated tissue and cell samples. Then, as in 1965, emergency generators were used for critical equipment. Additional backup power installed after the 1999 blackout kept the August 2003 blackout — which was similar to the 1965 blackout — from damaging research projects.
32
October 20, 1967
Celebrating 200 Years of P&S
P&S celebrated its bicentennial at a convocation that capped a three-day symposium on genetics and development. Columbia President Grayson Kirk conferred honorary degrees on six leading figures in medical science and philanthropy. Pictured are degree recipients with P&S dean H. Houston Merritt and Dr. Kirk. From left are Albert Baird Hastings, a 1921 P&S Ph.D. graduate and former professor at Harvard; Dr. Merritt; William Black, chairman of Chock full o’Nuts coffee company and benefactor of the Black Building; Dr. Kirk; Willard C. Rappleye, dean emeritus and retired vice president for medical affairs; James A. Shannon, director of the National Institutes of Health; Nobel Laureate Joshua Lederberg, who was a Stanford professor at the time and is now a professor emeritus at Rockefeller University (he spent two years in medical school at P&S but left to get a Ph.D. at Yale); and Nobel Laureate Konrad Bloch, who earned his Ph.D. in biochemistry from P&S in 1938 and was a professor at Harvard at the time of the bicentennial.
33 1968
BALSO
The Black and Latino Student Organization, established in 1968, is the center of the minority student community. It is an active chapter of the Student National Medical Association and the National Boriqua Latino Health Organization. It is dedicated to the recruitment, support, and graduation of students from ethnic groups traditionally underrepresented in medicine and other health sciences fields. BALSO offers peer and faculty counseling to members and mentoring to pre-medical students and students from local high schools. BALSO sponsors local and cultural events open to all members of the medical center community, including an annual jazz mixer, film nights, and monthly lunches. It promotes awareness about the complex health issues facing underserved communities by sponsoring talks and workshops on health care topics and cultural competency.
P&S has many programs to increase diversity. The Office of Minority Affairs & Diversity was established in 1968 to help recruit, counsel, and nurture minority students and to foster diversity among students and faculty. Students receive counseling to help them adjust to medical school and guidance concerning career choices. Each first-year minority student is assigned a faculty adviser and is paired with a second-year student.
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34 1970
Blessings Multiplied
America’s second set of surviving quintuplets went home from Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in April 1970 after a two-month hospital stay. Margaret Kienast delivered Amy, Sarah, William, Abigail, and Edward in a span of 10 minutes on Feb. 24, 1970.
Dr. Raphael Jewelewicz, then assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology, had prescribed the fertility drug Perganol for Mrs. Kienast. He and his colleagues had advance knowledge of the five expected babies and developed a detailed plan for their delivery. The birth of quintuplets was so extraordinary in 1970 that the news made headlines around the world.
Dr. Mieczyslaw Finster, then assistant professor of anesthesiology, supervised the administration of anesthetics and several other specialists were recruited to the team. The delivery of the Kienast quints would involve more than a dozen physicians and even more nurses, administering anesthesiological and resuscitation care in the delivery room and pediatric care in the Babies Hospital Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Many members of the team almost missed the event, however, as the labor proceeded rapidly and without a Caesarean section.
Dr. Jewelewicz is now a lecturer of obstetrics and gynecology. Dr. Finster is now a professor of anesthesiology and ob/gyn.
35 mid-1970s
Students Remember First “Teachers”
Since the mid-1970s, first-year P&S students have gathered in the Pauline Hartford Memorial Chapel late in the school year to honor individuals who helped them learn — the deceased individuals who donated their bodies to science for study in gross anatomy.
Chaplain Daniel Morrissey and Dr. Ernest April, associate professor of anatomy and cell biology, each year lead a congregation of students and faculty in honoring the individuals whose cadavers they examined over the course of the past year. The services vary from year to year. The 1999 service, for example, included literature from the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and e.e. cummings, and the theme of the service was Robert Test’s poem, “To Remember Me.”
Mr. Test wrote his poem in 1976. When he died in 1994 he left his body to science.
To pursue their anatomical studies, students must disassociate themselves from the cadavers they dissect. As the year comes to a close, Dr. April feels it is important for them to “realize, once again, that these are human beings.”
The catharsis was not lost on first-year student Matthew Carty, who spoke at the 1999 service and performed with fellow students in the Ultrasounds, a P&S male, a capella singing club. Afterward, Mr. Carty commented on the meaning of this service: “It’s closure. Closure to a year and an experience that’s pretty bizarre. It means a lot of different things to a lot of different people. What it means to me might not be the same as what it means to another student. But it’s a way to bring to some kind of end or resolution to our feelings over the course of the year.”
The memorial is part of a full spectrum of related services Columbia performs for the donors at no charge to their families. When a body is donated, the university takes responsibility for bringing the body to P&S, embalming and preparing the body for dissection, cremation, memorial service, and ultimately the return of ashes to families or interment at the Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn, in graves donated to Columbia during the mid 1800s. The donors’ plot is marked with a stone that reads, “In memory of those whose bequeathal to Columbia advanced medical science. In lumine Tuo videbimus lumen.” (In thy light shall we see light, the Columbia motto.)
36 1977
Expanding Health-Care Opportunities for the Community
In 1977, P&S and Presbyterian Hospital formed a clinic, the Associates in Internal Medicine, to serve the health-care needs of the Washington Heights community. The AIM clinic today records 70,000 patient visits every year at its facilities in Vanderbilt Clinic and in the Russ Berrie Medical Science Pavilion within the Audubon Research Park. Medical center neighbors receive primary care and subspecialty referrals at AIM. Patients can choose to participate in clinical research. “We are closing the gap for minority healthcare,” says Dr. Rafael Lantigua, professor of clinical medicine and AIM medical director. Eighty-five percent of AIM’s patients are minorities. Of them, 70 percent are Latino, 20 percent are African-American, and 10 percent non-Latino white. Dr. Lantigua shares administrative responsibility for AIM with Dr. Steven Shea, the Hamilton Southworth Professor of Medicine and chief of the Division of General Medicine at P&S and professor of epidemiology at the Mailman School of Public Health.
37 1979
Alan Alda’79 (Hon)
Actor Alan Alda’s speech to the P&S graduating class in 1979 was covered by the news media nationally and attracted numerous requests for a transcript of his remarks. The selection of Mr. Alda, who played a doctor on television’s “M*A*S*H” for many years, was a departure from the tradition of inviting prominent physicians as commencement speakers. The speech was reprinted in the Summer 1979 issue of P&S Journal. Here are some excerpts:
“Ever since it was announced that a non-doctor, in fact an actor, had been invited to give the commencement address at one of the most prestigious medical schools in the country people have been wondering Why get someone who only pretends to be a doctor when you could get a real one? Some people have suggested that this school had done everything it could to show you how to be doctors and in a moment of desperation had brought in someone who could show you how to act like one.
“You’re entering a special place in our society. People will be awed by your expertise. You’ll be placed in a position of privilege. You’ll live well, people will defer to you, call you by your title — and it may be hard to remember that the word doctor is not actually your first name. It’s easy to think that because our society grants us privilege that we’re entitled to it. Privilege feels good, but it can be intoxicating. As good doctors, I hope you’ll be able to keep yourselves free of toxins.”

Note: The character Alan Alda played on “M*A*S*H,” Dr. Hawkeye Pierce, was said to be modeled after the late Dr. Keith Reemtsma, professor and chairman of surgery at P&S from 1971 to 1994.
38 1980s, 1990s, and On
Herbert and Florence Irving
Herbert and Florence Irving are the most generous donors in CPMC history. That incredible relationship has played an important role in some of the breakthroughs in medical and clinical research at CPMC. Mr. Irving is a co-founder and former vice chairman of SYSCO Corp., which evolved from Global Frozen Foods, a business his brother-in-law started in the 1940s. After Mr. Irving returned from his service in World War II, he built Global into the largest frozen food distributorship in New York City. In 1969, Global and eight other distributors from across the country created one of the first and largest successful business partnerships known today as SYSCO (Systems and Services Company).
Since the 1980s, the Irvings have generously supported programs in research and clinical care at CPMC. In 1987 they provided funds to sponsor young researchers, known as Irving Scholars, and established the Irving Center for Clinical Research. In 1995, they sponsored the construction of CPMC’s new cancer treatment facilities that bear the Irving name. Also in the 1990s, the Irvings gave funds to create the Herbert Irving Professorship, to be held by the director of the cancer center, and four additional professorships.
CPMC’s cancer programs operate as the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center under the direction of Dr. Karen Antman. In 2001, Mr. and Mrs. Irving gave $21 million to help construct the Irving Cancer Research Center, the third building in the Audubon Biomedical Science and Technology Park. The building will double Columbia’s lab space for cancer research and expand the growing genetics program. The building is expected to open in early 2004.
39 1978-2000
Allan Formicola
Dr. Allan J. Formicola was dean of the School of Dental and Oral Surgery from 1978 to 2001, the longest-serving dean of Columbia University at the time he announced his decision to leave the dean's position. When Ira Lamster was named his successor as dean, Dr. Formicola did not fade away. He has remained in the Health Sciences administration and has established a new center, the Center for Community Health Partnerships. The center is the home base for a $26 million national initiative to help 15 dental schools develop community-based dental education programs and the Center for the Health of Urban Minorities, one of 10 NIH-funded health research disparity centers.
It was a natural segue for Dr. Formicola, who as SDOS dean established the Community DentCare Network for children and adults who otherwise have little or no access to dental care. The extensive alliance of school-based preventive dentistry and neighborhood primary care practices reaches thousands of people in northern Manhattan. Funded by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, DentCare has become a model for programs across the nation.
He also established the Northern Manhattan Community Voices Collaborative, which provides comprehensive health care plans that extend access to primary medical and oral health care to the uninsured and underinsured in northern Manhattan. Dr. Formicola created the blueprint for the Columbia Dental Plan that brought together more than 200 dental faculty practitioners and 250 faculty offices in the tristate metropolitan area, including three hospital dental staffs. It serves University faculty, officers, and students.
Dr. Formicola was responsible for reforming the dental school curriculum, which now includes areas of concentration for all third- and fourth-year students in research, clinical specialties, and uniquely designed electives. He expanded the hospital residency programs, which grew from only two residents in general practice to more than 40 residents and postdoctoral fellows in three programs — oral and maxillofacial surgery, pediatric dentistry, and general dentistry.
Dr. Formicola helped Harlem Hospital expand the mission of its dental service from a mainly emergency/oral surgical service to a comprehensive care service.
40 1980
Bayh-Dole Act
Technology transfer became part of academic medicine’s lexicon in the 1980s after Congress passed the Bayh-Dole Act to allow universities to claim ownership of intellectual property derived from federally supported research. Columbia was one of the first universities to establish a technology transfer office (now called Science and Technology Ventures). Columbia leads all U.S. universities in generating technology transfer revenues from patents and license agreements. Health Sciences research that has contributed to Columbia’s success in technology transfer includes health care technologies and biotech products such as tissue plasminogen activator, a clot-dissolving agent; Xalatan, a new drug to treat glaucoma; and ReoPro, an anticlotting agent.
41
John Chase Wood Jr.’76
1981
A Murder on Campus
The capture in 1995 of a second suspect in the murder of John Chase Wood Jr.’76 ended 14 years of unrest over an incident that destroyed a young family and shook up anyone who revered life. The arrest left his wife, Diana, a little more at ease as she and her son, John Chase Wood III, press forward.
“For me, the case is meaningful in that the perpetrator won’t be there to do the same thing to someone else,” said Diana Wood’88, now an anesthesiologist at the Lahey Hitchcock Clinic in Burlington, Mass. “It doesn’t bring John back to me. But for a lot of people, including my son, having the ‘bad guy’ caught makes them feel there is some right in the world.”
Before the night of Nov. 2, 1981, it seemed like everything was going right for the Woods. He was a 31-year-old resident in pediatric surgery and she was a 24-year-old surgical nurse at Presbyterian Hospital, four months pregnant with their first child. But hopes for the newlyweds ended abruptly that night as Dr. Wood walked back to Presbyterian Hospital after taking a dinner break at the couple’s nearby apartment.
Three young men — one with a gun — confronted him at the corner of 165th Street and Riverside Drive and demanded money. Dr. Wood apparently resisted. After a brief struggle, he was shot in the heart and died an hour later in the hospital where he worked.
The perpetrators escaped with a few credit cards and $5 in cash and ran from a senseless killing that left Diana Wood without a friend, a husband, and a father for her unborn child. But she was determined to steer clear of long-term grief. After John III was born in the spring of 1982, she vacationed with her parents and sister at Martha’s Vineyard to rethink her roadmap for life.
In what she calls an “impulse,” she decided to become a physician and immediately applied to the pre-med program at Columbia’s College of General Studies. Two years later she applied to P&S and was almost immediately accepted.
School administrators chose to waive her tuition because of the challenges she faced as a widow and a single parent. Dr. Donald Tapley was dean of the Faculty of Medicine at the time and Dr. Linda Lewis was dean of students.
“If I had not had that, it would have been an extreme financial hardship for me and my son,” Dr. Wood said. “The other aspect was, it was a gesture as if I was one of theirs, that they were going to take care of me if the person that was supposed to be taking care of me wasn’t going to. That made me feel really good.”
Dr. Wood also received emotional support from friends, faculty, and hospital employees as she carried her textbooks through the same halls where John learned medicine. A turning point for Dr. Wood in confronting John’s death came after a 1994 ceremony honoring New York City Police Detective Jerry Giorgio and his colleagues for persevering in their investigation. (One suspect was arrested in 1994.) There, several people who knew Dr. John Wood openly shared their thoughts about him.
“For so long a time, John’s death seemed like it happened only to me,” Dr. Wood recalled. “Seeing how other people react I realize that it didn’t just happen to me or to his family or his friends. It happened to the institution as well. It was a loss for all.” — Adapted from “A Murder and a Life Rebuilt,” Fall 1995 issue, P&S
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42
Former dean Herbert Pardes with Eppie Lederer, better known as Ann Landers, in 1992 when she received the Dean’s Award
1981
Advisers by Any Name
The current Columbia Presbyterian Health Sciences Advisory Council is a true partnership between Columbia Health Sciences and the Columbia Presbyterian campus of New York-Presbyterian Hospital to reach out to supporters of academic medicine.
Started in 1981 as the National Visiting Council, the group consists of distinguished individuals drawn from industry and society, who contribute a variety of professional and personal skills and experience and are strongly committed to encouraging excellence in health care. Their mission is to build recognition and resources for Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center’s programs in health care education, research, and patient services and advise the leadership of the medical center on various issues and questions of policy concerning both the hospital and the university.
The council was for many years advisory to the Health Sciences Division of Columbia University and was named the Health Sciences Advisory Council. In November 2000, the council was expanded to represent both the Health Sciences and the hospital’s Washington Heights campus. “By representing both the university and the hospital, our council will be better equipped to raise the visibility of CPMC and to promote its faculty,” said Henry L. King, chairman of the council, in announcing the council’s expanded scope.
Individual schools and many departments also have visiting councils or advisory groups they rely on for advice and support.
The council meets twice a year. A highlight of each meeting is the presentation of an award to an individual who has shown a strong and committed interest in health care and whose influence and reputation have made a significant impact on the public. The award, presented since 1990, was initially called the Dean’s Award and is now known as the Award for Distinguished Service. The cast bronze medallion is emblazoned with a unique logo commissioned by the council. It is engraved with an abstraction of the George Washington Bridge, representing the medical center’s bridge between basic research and clinical treatment and cure.
Recipients of the award include Mary Lasker, Rosalynn Carter, Ann Landers, Tipper Gore, Florence and Herbert Irving, Dr. Michael DeBakey, Cecilia Bartoli, Katharine Graham, Christopher Reeve, Rob Reiner, Jerry Lewis, and Mike Wallace.
43
1982
What’s Old is New Again
For many years, graduates of P&S received a non-descript diploma with black ink and block lettering announcing their completion of requirements for the Doctor of Medicine degree. The diploma was signed by the dean of the Faculty of Medicine but did not mention the College of Physicians & Surgeons by name.
In 1982, a new diploma was issued. James T. Goodrich’80 calls the genesis of the change “a rather spontaneous event that occurred after I had seen some of the earlier diplomas” in the archives in the late 1970s. Karen Hall, one of the librarians at the time, helped with the project, but Dr. Goodrich credits Dr. Ernest April, associate professor of anatomy and cell biology, as being the most helpful and continuing the effort after Dr. Goodrich graduated.
The new diploma, modeled after the P&S diploma presented in the mid-1800s, is more traditional. Instead of being a horizontal document (12 inches by 10 inches), the diploma is an 11x14-inch vertical document that uses an elegant script typeface. It includes Columbia and P&S seals and mentions both the Trustees of Columbia University and the College of Physicians & Surgeons. The diploma incorporates the spirit of the traditional Latin diploma by using the word Salutem, which appears in the original P&S diploma from the 1800s.
Although the new diplomas were not ready for the 1982 commencement ceremonies, the Class of 1982 was the first to receive the new diplomas once they were available.
Dr. Goodrich is now professor of clinical neurosurgery, pediatrics, and plastic & reconstructive surgery at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and director of pediatric neurosurgery at the Children’s Hospital at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx. As a 1980 graduate, he did not receive one of the new diplomas he helped create.
44
1984
A Degree of Thanks
When the Edward S. Harkness Eye Institute celebrated its 50th anniversary in the early 1980s, comedian Bob Hope was among the celebrants. Columbia awarded an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters to Mr. Hope for his contributions to charitable organizations and for his support of the Harkness Eye Institute’s children’s tumor clinic during the previous 15 years. With Mr. Hope are Dr. Charles Campbell, chairman of ophthalmology at the time, and Dr. Donald Tapley, then dean.
45
June 9, 1984
Heart Transplant History
James Preston “J.P.” Lovette IV of Denver became the beneficiary of the world’s first successful pediatric heart transplant in 1984. Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center surgeons transplanted the heart of 4-year-old John Nathan Ford of Harlem into 4-year-old J.P.’s chest a day after the Harlem child died of injuries received in a fall from a fire escape at his home.
J.P., son of Patricia and James Lovette, was born with multiple heart defects. He was the youngest patient to survive a heart transplant for more than a few hours.
The transplant was done by a surgical team led by Dr. Eric A. Rose, director of cardiac transplantation at Presbyterian Hospital at the time. He is now Morris & Rose Milstein and Johnson and Johnson Professor and Chairman of Surgery at P&S and surgeon in chief at New York-Presbyterian Hospital’s Columbia Presbyterian campus. Drs. Keith Reemtsma and Fred Bowman also were members of the team for the six-hour operation.
Successful anti-rejection drugs for transplant patients made J.P.’s operation possible. “We no longer consider heart transplants experimental,” said Dr. Rose. “Applying the successes we’ve had with adult heart transplants to children was the next logical step.”
J.P. returned in October 2002 to help celebrate 25 years of heart transplantation at Columbia-Presbyterian. New York-Presbyterian’s heart transplant program is the nation’s largest.

J.P. Lovette with his parents in 1984 and at the 25th anniversary of the heart transplant program in 2002
46
Eleanor and Lou Gehrig at Yankee Stadium in 1936
1984
Lou and Eleanor Gehrig
The Eleanor and Lou Gehrig MDA/ALS Center was founded in the Neurological Institute in 1987 by Dr. Lewis P. Rowland, then chairman of neurology. When Eleanor Gehrig, the widow of the
legendary New York Yankees first baseman, Lou Gehrig, died in 1984 she left $100,000 for CPMC. It was recognition of a Columbia-Presbyterian physician, Caldwell B. Esselstyn, who had taken care of Lou Gehrig during his struggle with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which became known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.
Today the Gehrig Center sees about 300 new patients each year, conducts clinical trials of drugs intended to slow progress of the disease, seeks ways to improve diagnosis of ALS, and educates tomorrow’s health care practitioners in the most advanced treatment for the incurable disease.
It is one of 30 MDA/ALS centers in the country. It offers all the specialties required for ALS care: neurologists, nurse practitioners, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists, psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, nutritionists, pulmonologists, and gastroenterologists. “We cannot yet offer a cure of ALS or even reliably slow its progress, but our collaboration promotes the highest function possible for patients and the highest possible quality of life,” says Dr. Hiroshi Mitsumoto, the center’s director since 1999.
George Pollock, a lawyer for the Gehrig family, leveraged the public’s fascination with Lou Gehrig, who is still remembered more than 60 years later as “The Pride of the Yankees” and “The Iron Horse,” by licensing rights for Lou Gehrig’s picture and name.
As a Columbia College student from 1921 to 1923, Gehrig played football and baseball for the Lions. He is widely regarded as the greatest student athlete in Columbia's history.
Lou Gehrig retired from the New York Yankees in 1939 after learning that he had ALS. Eleanor Gehrig devoted herself to him until he died two years later. She dedicated her autobiography about her life with Lou, “My Luke and I,” to Dr. Esselstyn, who was Lou Gehrig’s personal physician from shortly after his diagnosis until his death. He was a surgeon and an accomplished athlete who had been asked to care for Gehrig because of his ties to medicine and sports. Dr. Esselstyn, a 1929 graduate of P&S, was present at Lou Gehrig’s death at his home in the Bronx in June 1941.
47
1984
Maxwell Hall: Gone But Not Forgotten
Maxwell Hall, named for Anna C. Maxwell, the nursing school’s founder, was the first medical center building to open in 1928. It was a glorious building that sat atop a bluff with views of the Hudson River and New Jersey Palisades. Amenities included a pool, auditorium, classroom, dining hall, library, and infirmary. Maxwell Hall was demolished in 1984 to make room for the Milstein Hospital Building.
48 1985
Home Health Guides
The first of a series of home health guides published by Columbia Health Sciences was published in 1985. Donald F. Tapley, former dean, was medical editor of “The Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons Complete Home Medical Guide,” published by Crown Publishers. The third revised edition of the guide was published in 1995. Companion guides were published on pregnancy (1988), early child care (1990), mental health (1992), and dental health (1997).
49 1984/1986
The Howard Hughes Legacy at Columbia
The Howard Hughes Medical Institute — widely known in medical research circles as HHMI — funds medical research at the nation’s top medical schools. HHMI supports two programs at Columbia — the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Program in Molecular Neurobiology, headed by Nobel laureate and University Professor Eric Kandel, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Program in Structural Biology, led by Wayne Hendrickson, also a prestigious University Professor — and several other Columbia-HHMI investigators in other labs.
The molecular neurobiology program began in 1984, the structural biology program in 1986.
50 1986
Women as Department Leaders
1986 Women as Department Leaders
The first woman to lead a P&S department was Dr. Lucille Shapiro, an authority on microbial developmental biology. She was appointed chairwoman of the Department of Microbiology in 1986. She chaired the department until 1989, when she left to chair the developmental biology department at Stanford University.
In 1995, P&S named the first female chair of a clinical department when it appointed Dr. Margaret Wood, a national anesthesiology expert, to chair the Department of Anesthesiology. She remains in the position. Dr. Mary D’Alton, who chairs the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, is the other female chair at the school.

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