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P&S Journal

P&S Journal: Fall 1997, Vol.17, No.3
In Memoriam
ALUMNI

Class of 1927
Frederic Taylor, professor emeritus of surgery at Indiana University School of Medicine, died Feb. 15, 1997. Dr. Taylor was also chief of surgery at Marion County General Hospital and a member of the staff of Methodist and Roudebush West 19th Street VA hospitals. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. Survivors include his wife, Anne, a son, two daughters, and 10 grandchildren.

 

Class of 1930
Sidney E. Lenke Sidney E. Lenke, a retired internist and devoted alumnus, died Jan. 28, 1997. Dr. Lenke trained in pathology at Mount Sinai. A longtime clinical instructor at Downstate Medical Center, he was affiliated with North Shore Hospital in Manhasset, N.Y. He served as a major in the U.S. Army Medical Corps during World War II. Outside the practice of medicine and his family, one of his great passions in life was helping to organize and promote the support of P&S among his fellow alumni. As class chairman for many years, he invariably added his own personal touch to the annual appeal and thus helped rally the ranks. He is survived by his wife, Helen, son Roger'72, chief of OB/GYN at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center at Denver, two daughters, and three grandchildren . . . . Word has been received of the death of Stephen D. Mills on Dec. 27, 1995. A retired pediatric hematologist, Dr. Mills had been associate professor of clinical pediatrics at the Mayo Graduate School of Medicine and an emeritus staff member of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. At the Mayo Clinic he participated in one of the earliest successful bone marrow transplantations in a child with aplastic anemia. Dr. Mills served in active duty with the U.S. Navy Medical Reserve during World War II and helped treat D-Day casualties at the U.S. Naval Hospital in Netley, England, in 1944. His first wife, Alice, preceded him in death. Surviving him are his second wife, Ruth, a son, and two daughters.

 

Class of 1931
Retired dermatologist and life fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology, C. Douglas Walsh died Jan. 17, 1997. He leaves behind two sons and two grandchildren.

 

Class of 1934
Irving H. Rosenbaum, a specialist in geriatric medicine and former medical director of Sarasota Pines, a nursing home in Sarasota, Fla., died May 2, 1997. Dr. Rosenbaum served as a Naval flight surgeon during World War II, surviving the sinking of the vessel to which he was assigned. He leaves his wife, Julia, four daughters, three sons, and four grandchildren.

 

Class of 1935
Isidore Ziferstein died April 7, 1997. Psychiatrist, educator, and antiwar activist, Dr. Ziferstein was on the front lines of protest against the Vietnam War and nuclear proliferation, arguing that the government's efforts to promote the war effort to the public was undermining Americans' mental health. Dr. Ziferstein, who pursued a private psychoanalytic practice in Los Angeles, served for many years as staff psychiatrist for Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California. Professionally, he pursued a special research interest in transcultural psychiatry. He had been an active board member of the American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California and a member of the board of directors of Viewer Sponsored Television, a precursor to public television. Survivors include his wife, Bess, a son, a daughter, and three grandchildren.

 

Class of 1936
The alumni office has had word of the death of Dominic C. D'Ambruoso on Dec. 25, 1996. A retired anesthesiologist formerly affiliated with Hartford Hospital in Hartford, Conn., he served in the Army Medical Corps during World War II. He is survived by a son, a daughter, and five grandchildren.

 

Class of 1937
The alumni office has received word of the death of George Falkner of Walla Walla, Wash., in September 1995. A general surgeon and past president of the Washington State chapter of the American College of Surgeons and the Walla Walla County Medical Society, Dr. Falkner trained at St. Luke's Hospital in New York. A captain in the U.S. Army, he served with the Second Evacuation Hospital during World War II. He is survived by five daughters, two sons, and three grandchildren . . . . Clifford Wray died Jan. 3, 1997. Dr. Wray had been in-house doctor in the 1930s for the New York Times. He served as chief of staff and president of the Jefferson County Medical Association and as school doctor for the Board of Education of Watertown, N.Y., where he pursued a private general practice. Dr. Wray served in the U.S. Army during World War II. Surviving him are his wife, Helen, two sons, a daughter, and three grandchildren.

 

Class of 1937 MSD
Frederick Lee Liebolt '37MSD Frederick Lee Liebolt '37MSD
Word has been received of the death of retired cardiologist Francis L. Chamberlain, date unknown. Dr. Chamberlain was professor emeritus of medicine at the University of California School of Medicine, San Francisco. There are no known survivors . . . . Frederick Lee Liebolt, a former associate professor of clinical surgery (orthopedics) at Cornell University Medical College, died Aug. 1, 1996. From 1938 to 1947, Dr. Liebolt was an instructor in orthopedic surgery at P&S. The author of 33 original research papers in his field, he also wrote a book, "Illustrated Review of Fracture Treatment," and contributed chapters to eight books on orthopedics. In 1947, he was one of seven surgeons who first performed a televised operation, in conjunction with a meeting of the American College of Surgeons. Dr. Liebolt also had been orthopedic consultant to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. Twice married, he is survived by two sons, a daughter, and two granddaughters.

 

Class of 1940
John Hutchinson, a specialist in insurance medicine, died Dec. 11, 1996. Dr. Hutchinson had been vice president of medical underwriting at the New York Life Insurance Company and a past president of the Association of Life Insurance Medical Directors of America. He saw active duty during World War II as a captain in the U.S. Medical Corps stationed in the Pacific Theater. He is survived by two daughters, a son, and two grandchildren.

 

Class of 1941
Leonard Jarcho '41 Leonard Jarcho '41
The alumni office has received word of the death of Virginia G. Harris on Jan. 30, 1995. With combined specialties of pediatrics and public health, Dr. Harris served as clinical associate professor of pediatrics and OB/GYN at the Upstate Medical Center at the State University of New York in Syracuse. Her areas of research included smoking and health, accidental poisoning, teen-age pregnancy, playground safety, and lead poisoning. She is survived by her husband, William Harris'43M, two daughters, and a son . . . . Word has been received of the death of Phyllis H. Hawkins of Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, on April 11, 1996. There are no known survivors . . . . Leonard W. Jarcho died Aug. 28, 1996. He retired from the University of Utah, where he helped establish the neurology department and served as the first chairman of neurology. Dr. Jarcho saw active duty with the U.S. Medical Corps at Guadalcanal and elsewhere in the Pacific Theater during World War II. He is survived by his wife, Ann, and brother, Saul'30.

 

Class of 1942
Retired radiologist and emeritus professor of radiology at the University of Louisville School of Medicine, Lawrence A. Davis died Feb. 20, 1997. Dr. Davis previously served as chief of radiology and president of the medical staff of Children's Hospital in Louisville, Ky. Surviving him are his wife, Lois, and two sons.

 

Class of 1943M
Word has been received of the death of Myles Boyle, a retired general surgeon from Cambridge, Ohio, in 1985. He is survived by his wife, Harriet, four daughters, and a son . . . . Frank D. Gray, a retired internist and emeritus professor and former chairman of medicine at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, died in the spring of 1997, exact date unknown. Dr. Gray also had taught at Yale. He was the author of 65 papers, mostly in the field of pulmonary and cardiopulmonary care. He is survived by his wife, Dr. Frieda Gray . . . . Fred Kern Jr., professor emeritus of medicine at the University of Colorado in Denver, died May 2, 1997. Dr. Kern helped train generations of academic gastroenterologists who went on to teach at medical schools or research institutes in the United States, Canada, Australia, and Chile. A distinguished researcher, Dr. Kern was known for his investigations in the areas of lipid metabolism, lactose intolerance, inflammatory bowel disease, the effects of estrogen and pregnancy on gallstone formation, and other areas of liver and digestive diseases. Dr. Kern was co-author of three books, 31 chapters in clinical textbooks, and more than 200 scientific articles. He received, among other honors, the 1988 University of Colorado Medal and the 1986 Friedenwald Medal, the highest award of the American Gastroenterological Association. In 1986 he was named master of the American College of Physicians. Surviving him are his wife, Bernie, two daughters, a son, and seven grandchildren.

 

Class of 1943D
Robert A. Butz of Boise, Idaho, died March 30, 1996. Dr. Butz served in the U.S. Army Medical Corps during World War II. In the course of his army service, he became involved in the translation into English of Japanese medical findings on the fate of victims of atomic bombings. This translation was one of the first official reports detailing the medical consequences of the bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Dr. Butz practiced radiology, for many years heading the radiology department at Sacred Heart Hospital in Idaho Falls, where he was also chief of staff. He is survived by three sons, a daughter, and seven grandchildren . . . . Everett Delabarre, a specialist in rehabilitation medicine, died Feb. 17, 1997. Dr. Delabarre had been associate professor of rehabilitation medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine and a staff member of the Boston VA Medical Center. He was a retired captain in the U.S. Naval Reserve, having served in World War II and the Korean War. Surviving him are a daughter, five sons, and four grandchildren.

 

Class of 1944
William Howland, a former assistant professor of anesthesiology at P&S, died Dec. 24, 1996. Dr. Howland trained in urology before completing a residency in anesthesiology at Presbyterian Hospital, where he later joined the anesthesiology staff. In 1953, he moved his professional base across town to Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, where he was named chairman of anesthesiology. Later as an associate in the experimental surgery division, he established and directed the experimental anesthesiology section. Dr. Howland was a past president of the New York State Society of Anesthesiologists and an adviser to the World Health Organization. His writings include eight books and more than 300 articles, abstracts, and book chapters in the field. At the time of his death, Dr. Howland was professor emeritus at Cornell. A veteran of the U.S. Army Medical Corps, he served as chief of urology at a military hospital in Bremerhaven, Germany, immediately after World War II. He is survived by his wife, Miriam, a public health educator, a son, a daughter, and two grandchildren.

 

Class of 1946
Word has been received of the death of Thomas N. Cross on Dec. 13, 1996. A former assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of Michigan, Dr. Cross authored two books on the interplay of psychology and literature and pursued a busy private practice. Dr. Cross attained the rank of lieutenant in the U.S. Naval Reserve Medical Corps. He leaves behind a wife, Patricia, a daughter, two sons, and a brother, Richard Cross'41 . . . . The alumni office has learned of the death of Jean-Claude Michel on Dec. 1, 1996. A retired cardiologist and former clinical professor of medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle, he was affiliated with Swedish, Providence, Maynard, Virginia Mason, Renton VA, and University of Washington hospitals. Surviving him are his wife, Elsie Jeanette, and six children.

 

Class of 1948
Henry H. Krakauer, an internist who retired to Highland Beach, Fla., died April 1, 1997. He leaves behind his wife, Violet.

 

Class of 1951
The alumni office has learned of the death of Roy L. McKittrick on Aug. 18, 1996. A retired surgeon in Rocky Ford, Colo., he flew his own plane to see patients at rural hospitals in the southeast corner of the state. Dr. McKittrick served three terms as mayor of Rocky Ford. He was honored with the Man of the Year Award in 1982 and the state award from the Colorado Medical Society for his pro bono work in developing housing for low income and elderly populations. Among his other volunteer activities, Dr. McKittrick served with Care Medico in Malaysia. He is survived by his wife, La Berta, two sons, three daughters, and 10 grandchildren.

 

Class of 1953
Carl Barlow, honorary attending physician in plastic surgery at Lenox Hill Hospital, died April 3, 1997. Before attending medical school, Dr. Barlow earned his D.D.S. from Columbia's School of Dental and Oral Surgery in 1950. He was stationed in Germany while serving as a captain in the U.S. Army Medical Corps from 1955 to 1957. Dr. Barlow was affiliated with the Queens Hospital Center, where he was director of plastic surgery, and the Long Island Jewish Hospital. Surviving him is his wife, June, a 1958 Columbia School of Nursing graduate.

 

Class of 1959
Word has been received of the death of plastic surgeon D. Verne McConnell on July 22, 1996. Dr. McConnell was clinical professor of surgery at the Ohio Valley Medical Center and had been associate professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery at the West Virginia University Medical Center in Wheeling, W.Va. He served as past president of the Ohio Valley Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons. He is survived by his wife, Jane, two daughters, two sons, and six grandchildren.

 

Class of 1961
Temby R. Argall died Dec. 10, 1996. Trained in internal medicine at Hartford Hospital and in adolescent medicine at Children's Hospital in Boston, he spent a decade in general practice before switching to emergency medicine and joining the emergency room staff at Sharon Hospital in Sharon, Conn., where he remained for much of his career. Dr. Argall was a former instructor in community medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine. He is survived by his mother, Frances Argall, three daughters, and two grandsons.

 

Class of 1987
Charles "Chip" K. Bacon died suddenly March 5, 1997. Dr. Bacon pursued a residency in otolaryngology at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia before joining Peninsula ENT Associates in Hampton, Va. He leaves behind his wife, Ellen, a registered nurse, and his brother, Jeffrey, a doctor.

 

Correction
Kendall K. Kane'60 died July 27, 1994--not 1996--and is survived by his second wife, Gay, and four children.

 

Betty Shabazz, Ph.D.
Dr. Betty Shabazz, who died June 23 from injuries suffered in a June 1 fire in her home, touched P&S most profoundly through the Malcolm X Medical Scholarship program.

Dr. Shabazz helped P&S establish the scholarship in 1984 as a legacy to her husband, who was assassinated in 1965 at the Audubon Ballroom near Columbia-Presbyterian. The scholarship is awarded each year to third- and fourth-year minority students at P&S who demonstrate academic merit and a commitment to provide medical assistance to their communities.

Dr. Shabazz also was a member of the Columbia-Presbyterian Health Sciences Advisory Council.


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