CUMC Home | Columbia University | Jobs at CUMC | Contact CUMC | Find People
     
Columbia University Medical Center logo,Positioning Line Discover. Educate. Care. Lead., image for New York Skyline  
 

The Dean's Lecture Series
Alexander Ming Fisher Lecture

Dean's Distinguished Lecture in the Basic Sciences

The Cartwright Lecture

Dean's Distinguished Lecture in the Clinical Sciences

David Seegal Alpha Omega Alpha Visiting Professorship Lecture

Heidelberger-Kabat Lecture

Dean's Distinguished Lecture in the Humanities

Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize Lecture
2011-2012 events
past events

Samuel Rudin Distinguished Visiting Professorship Lecture

Thomas Q. Morris Symposia


Previous lectures:
2003-2004
2005-2006
2006-2007
2007-2008
2008-2009

Lecture Videos

home


      

Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize Lectures

The Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize was established under the will of the late S. Gross Horwitz through a bequest to Columbia University, and is named to honor the donor's mother. Louisa Gross Horwitz was the daughter of Dr. Samuel David Gross (1805-1889), a prominent surgeon of Philadelphia, and author of the outstanding Systems of Surgery, who served as President of the American Medical Association.  Each year, since its inception in 1967, the Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize has been awarded by Columbia University for outstanding basic research in the fields of biology or biochemistry. The purpose of this award is to honor a scientific investigator, or group of investigators, whose contributions to knowledge in either of these fields are deemed worthy of special recognition.

The Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize website

2013 Louisa Gross Horwitz Press Release



Available Videos:
Speaker: Edvard I. Moser, PhD
Lecture Date: January 16, 2014
Lecture Title: “Grid Cells and Neural Maps of Space”
Speaker: May-Britt Moser, PhD
Lecture Date: January 16, 2014
Lecture Title: “Hippocampus, Space, and Memory”

The 2013 Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize Lectures

John Michael O'Keefe, PhD, FRS

"The Hippocampal Cognitive Map: Past, Present and Future"

John Michael O'Keefe, PhD, FRS
Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience
Director, Sainsbury Wellcome Centre for Neural Circuits and Behaviour
University College London

Thursday, January 16, 2014
10:00 am
Davis Auditorium (Rm. 412), Schapiro Center (CEPSR)
530 West 120th Street

John O’Keefe is professor of cognitive neuroscience and director of the Sainsbury Wellcome Centre for Neural Circuits and Behaviour at University College London. He was born in New York, where he received a bachelor's degree in psychology from City College of New York, which he followed with a doctoral degree in physiological psychology from McGill University in Montreal. He joined University College London in 1967 as a National Institute of Mental Health postdoctoral fellow and has been there ever since, becoming a professor in 1987. He is a Fellow of both the Royal Society and the Academy of Medical Sciences. He has been awarded the Feldberg Foundation Prize for work in medical and biological science, the Grawemeyer Prize in Psychology, the British Neuroscience Association award for Outstanding Contribution to British Neuroscience, the Federation of European Neuroscience Societies (FENS) EJN prize, the Gruber Neuroscience Prize, and the Ferrier Prize Lecture for his pioneering work in cognitive neuroscience.

Dr. O’Keefe discovered that hippocampal pyramidal cells respond selectively to an animal’s spatial location. The discovery of "place cells" suggested that this part of the brain might function as a cognitive map. The cognitive map theory is now one of the dominant theoretical paradigms in the study of hippocampal function. The discovery of cells with such abstract cognitive properties and the formulation of the cognitive map theory were important early milestones in the development of the field of cognitive neuroscience.


Edvard I. Moser, PhD

"Grid Cells and Neural Maps of Space"

Edvard I. Moser, PhD
Professor of Neuroscience
Director, Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience
Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience/ Centre for Neural Computation
Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Thursday, January 16, 2014
12:30 pm
Hammer Health Sciences Center, Room 401
701 West 168th Street

Edvard Moser is professor of neuroscience and director of the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim.He is interested in how spatial location and spatial memory are computed in the brain. His work, conducted with long-term collaborator May-Britt Moser, includes the discovery of grid cells in the entorhinal cortex, which provides clues to a neural mechanism for the metric of spatial mapping. Subsequent to this discovery the Mosers have identified additional space-representing cell types in the entorhinal cortex and they are beginning to unravel how the neural microcircuit is organized. Edvard Moser received his initial training at the University of Oslo under the supervision of Dr. Per Andersen on mechanisms of memory formation in the hippocampus in freely moving animals. In 1995-96, he worked as a postdoc with Richard Morris on the role of long-term potentiation in hippocampal memory. In 1996, he spent three months with John O'Keefe to learn tetrode recording in the hippocampus. Edvard Moser accepted an associate professorship at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in August 1996, becoming a full professor in 1998. In 2002 he became the founding director of the Centre for the Biology of Memory, a Research Council-funded Centre of Excellence. In 2007 the Centre became a Kavli Institute, with Edvard Moser as director. He is also co-director of the newly established Centre for Neural Computation at the same institution. Together with May-Britt Moser, Edvard Moser was awarded the W. Alden Spencer Award in 2005, the Koetser Award in 2006, the Bettencourt Prize for Life Sciences in 2006, Erik Fernström's Great Nordic Prize in 2008, the Louis Jeantet Prize and Anders Jahre's Great Nordic Prize in 2011, and the Perl/UNC Neuroscience Prize in 2012.


May-Britt Moser, PhD

"Hippocampus, Space, and Memory"

May-Britt Moser, PhD
Professor of Neuroscience
Director, Centre for Neural Computation
Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience/ Centre for Neural Computation
Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Thursday, January 16, 2013
3:30 pm
Alumni Auditorium, First Floor
650 West 168th Street

May-Britt Moser is professor of neuroscience and director of the Centre for Neural Computation at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim. She is interested in the neural basis of spatial location and spatial specifically and cognition more generally. Her work, conducted with long-term collaborator Edvard Moser, includes the discovery of grid cells in the entorhinal cortex. The discovery of grid cells was succeeded by identification of other functional cell types, including head direction cells, conjunctive cells, and border cells. Collectively the findings point to the entorhinal cortex as a hub for the brain network that makes us find our way. In combination with the place cells of the hippocampus, the entorhinal network provides a "coordinate system" for on-line measurement of distance and direction within given constellations of landmarks. May-Britt Moser received her initial training at the University of Oslo under the supervision of Dr. Per Andersen. She obtained her PhD in neurophysiology in 1995 on the structural basis of hippocampal memory. In 1995-96, she worked as a postdoc with Richard Morris on septotemporal differentiation within the hippocampus and the role of long-term potentiation in spatial memory. In 1996, she spent one month with John O'Keefe to learn tetrode recording in the hippocampus. May-Britt Moser accepted an associate professorship at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in August 1996 and became a full professor in 2000. In 2002 she became founding co-director of the Centre for the Biology of Memory, a Research Council-funded Centre of Excellence. In 2012, she was appointed director of the newly established Centre for Neural Computation at the same institution. Together with Edvard Moser, May-Britt Moser was awarded the W. Alden Spencer Award in 2005, the Koetser Award in 2006, the Bettencourt Prize for Life Sciences in 2006, Erik Fernström's Great Nordic Prize in 2008, the Louis Jeantet Prize and Anders Jahre's Great Nordic Prize in 2011, and the Perl/UNC Neuroscience Prize in 2012.



back to top

PAST LOUISA GROSS HORWITZ PRIZE WINNERS

2012 Joe Lutkenhaus, PhD
University of Kansas Medical School
Richard Losick, PhD
Harvard University
Lucy Shapiro, PhD
Stanford University School of Medicine
2011 Jeffery C. Hall, Ph.D.
Brandeis University
Michael Rosbash, Ph.D.
Brandeis University
Michael W. Young, Ph.D.
The Rockefeller University
2010 Thomas J. Kelly, M.D., Ph.D.
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
Bruce Stillman, Ph.D.
President, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
2009 Victor R. Ambrose, Ph.D.
University of Massachusetts Medical School
Gary Ruvkun, Ph.D. Harvard Medical School
2008 F. Ulrich Hartl, M.D., Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry Martinsried, Germany
Arthur Horwich, M.D., Yale University School of Medicine
2007 Joseph G. Gall, Carnegie Institution
Elizabeth H. Blackburn, University of California, San Francisco
Carol W. Greider, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
2006 Roger D. Kornberg, Stanford School of Medicine
2005 Ada Yonath, Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Center for Biomolecular Structure and Assembly of the Weizmann Institute of Science
2004 Tony Hunter, Salk Institute for Biological Studies
Anthony Pawson, University of Toronto
2003 Roderick MacKinnon, Rockefeller University
2002 James E. Rothman, Sloan-Kettering Institute
Randy W. Schekman, University of California, Berkeley
2001 Avram Hershko, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Israel
Alexander Varshavsky, California Institute of Technology, CA
2000 H. Robert Horvitz, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA
Stanley J. Korsmeyer, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
1999 Pierre Chambon, Institute Génétique et de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire,
Université L. Pasteur, Illkirch-Strasbourg, France; Collége de France, Paris
Robert Roeder, Rockefeller University, New York, NY
Robert Tijan, Howard Hughes Medical Institute;University of California at Berkeley
1998 Arnold J. Levine, Rockefeller University, New York, NY
Bert Vogelstein, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
1997 Stanley B. Prusiner, University of California, San Francisco
1996 Clay M. Armstrong, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
Bertil Hille, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
1995 Leland H. Hartwell, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
1994 Philippa Marrack, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
John W. Kappler, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
1993 Nicole Le Douarin, Institut d'Embryologie Cellulaire et Moléculaire, Nogent-sur-Marne, France
Donald Metcalf, The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medicine, Victoria, Australia
1992 Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard, Max-Planck-Institut für Entwicklungbiologie, Tübingen, Germany
Edward B. Lewis, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA
1991 Richard Ernst, Laboratorium für Physikalische Chemie, Zurich, Switzerland
Kurt Wuthrich, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Institut für Molekularbiologie und Biophysik, Zurich, Switzerland
1990 Stephen Harrison, Howard Hudges Medical Institute, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
Michael G. Rossmann, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
Don C. Wiley, Howard Hughes Medical Center, Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA
1989 Alfred G. Gilman, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Ctr., Dallas, TX
Edwin G. Krebs, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Research Laboratories, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
1988 Thomas R. Cech, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO
Philip A. Sharp, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA
1987 Günter Blobel, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY
1986 Erwin Neher, Max-Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Gottingen, Germany
Bert Sakmann, Max-Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Gottingen, Germany
1985 Donald D. Brown, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Baltimore, MD
Mark Ptashne, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
1984 Michael S. Brown, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, Dallas, TX
Joseph Goldstein, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX
1983 Stanley Cohen, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
Vitkor Hamburger, Washington University, St. Louis, MO
Rita Levi-Montalcini, Instituto di Biologia Cellulare, Rome, Italy
1982 Barbara McClintock, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY
Susumu Tonegawa, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA
1981 Aaron Klug, Medical Research Council, Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, England
1980 Cesar Milstein, Medical Research Council, Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, England
1979 Walter Gilbert, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
Frederick Sanger, Medical Research Council of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, England
1978 David Hubel, Harvard University School of Medicine, Boston, MA
Vernon Mountcastle, Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
Torsten Wiesel, Rockefeller University, New York, NY
1977 Michael Heidelberger, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY
Elvin A. Kabat, Columbia University, New York, NY
Henry G. Kunkel, Columbia University, New York, NY
1976 Seymour Benzer, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA
Charles Yanofsky, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
1975 K. Sune D. Bergstrom, Nobel Foundation, Stockholm, Sweden
Bengt Samuelsson, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden
1974 Boris Ephrussi, Paris, France
1973 Renato Dulbecco, The Salk Institute, San Diego, CA
Harry Eagle, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Theodore T. Puck, University of Colorado Medical Ctr., Denver, CO
1972 Stephen W. Kuffler
1971 Hugh E. Huxley, Medical Research Council, Laboratory of Molecular Biology,
Cambridge, England
1970 Albert Claude
George E. Palade, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
Keith R. Porter, University of Maryland-Baltimore County, Catonsville, MD
1969 Max Delbrück, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA
Salvador E. Luria, Massachusetts Institute of Techn., Cambridge, MA
1968 H. Gobind Khorana, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA
Marshall Warren Nirenberg, National Heart, Lung & Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD
1967 Luis F. Leloir, Instituto de Investigaciones Bioquimicas, Buenos Aires, Argentina


back to top

CUMC Home | © Columbia University | Affiliated with New York-Presbyterian Hospital | Comments | Text-Only Version