Taub Institute: Genomics Core
AN NIA-FUNDED ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE RESEARCH CENTER

 

Columbia University
Medical Center
Neurological Institute

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Taub Institute news and events

News


2017 - 2016 | 2015 - 2011

  • MEET DR. PHILIP DE JAGER
    Neuro-immunology Specialist

    Philip De Jager, PhD, MD, MMSc
    The Department of Neurology is very pleased to announce that Philip De Jager, PhD, MD, MMSc has joined our faculty as Professor of Neurology (in the Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer's disease and the Aging Brain (link is external) and the Columbia Precision Medicine Initiative). After graduating from Yale University with a degree in Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry (as well as Medieval French literature), Dr. De Jager received a PhD in Neurogenetics from Rockefeller University and an MD from Cornell University Medical College before completing his MMSc in Clinical Investigation at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and MIT. He served as a neurology resident in the Partners Neurology Residency Program at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He then joined the faculty at HMS, rising to the rank of associate professor before joining CUMC. The goal of Dr. De Jager's work as a clinician-scientist is to apply modern methods of neuro-immunology, statistical genetics, and systems biology to the understanding of common neurodegenerative diseases. In Neurology, Dr. De Jager will serve as chief of a new Division of Neuro-immunology, which will include a new Center for Translational & Systems Neuro-immunology that he will direct, as well as the Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Care and Research Center, directed by Dr. Claire Riley. The focus of this new division will be to characterize and target the neuro-immunologic component of neurodegenerative disease. Please join us in welcoming Dr. De Jager to Neurology and CUMC!
  • CNBC
    March 15, 2017
    Brain Aging Linked to Common Genetic Variant
    "A group of researchers has discovered a genetic variant that appears to have a significant impact on how quickly the brain ages in older people, and that may influence a person's risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases. The research was reported Wednesday in the journal Cell Systems. 'If you look at a group of seniors, some will look older than their peers and some will look younger,' said the study's co-author Asa Abeliovich in a news release. 'The same differences in aging can be seen in the frontal cortex, the brain region responsible for higher mental processes..." [read more]

    Also covered by Bioscience Technology, International Business Times, and Daily Mail.
  • PHILLY.COM - HEALTH
    February 28, 2017
    Concussions More Likely in Female Athletes
    "Female athletes appear to be more likely than men to suffer concussions during their careers on the field, a new study suggests.

    The findings add to the existing evidence that female athletes may be more susceptible to concussions, even as attention has tended to focus on the risk to male football players.

    'The more we look at concussion, the more we realize that women are at high risk,' said study co-author Dr. James Noble. He's an assistant professor of neurology at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City..." [read more]
  • CUNY TV
    February 7, 2017
    Science & U!
    Editor's Note: In Segment 3, neurologist Dr. Richard Mayeux illuminates early onset dementia. [watch video]
  • CUMC NEWSROOM
    January 19, 2017
    In Alzheimer's, Excess Tau Protein Damages Brain's GPS
    "Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers have discovered that the spatial disorientation that leads to wandering in many Alzheimer's disease patients is caused by the accumulation of tau protein in navigational nerve cells in the brain. The findings, in mice, could lead to early diagnostic tests for Alzheimer's and highlight novel targets for treating this common and troubling symptom.

    The study was published online today in the journal Neuron.

    An estimated three out of five people with Alzheimer's disease wander and get lost, usually beginning in the early stages of the disease, leaving them vulnerable to injury. Researchers suspect that these problems originate in an area of the brain known as the entorhinal cortex (EC). The EC plays a key role in memory and navigation and is among the first brain structures affected by the buildup of neurofibrillary tangles that are largely composed of tau, a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. "Until now, no one has been able to show how tau pathology might lead to navigational difficulties," said co-study leader Karen E. Duff, PhD, professor of pathology & cell biology (in psychiatry and in the Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer’s Disease and the Aging Brain) at Columbia..." [read more]

    Also covered by: Lab Chat (STAT), Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Cosmos Magazine, Medical News, ScienceDaily, Medical News Today, Daily Mail, Mirror, PsyPost, Alzheimer's Reading Room, and Medical Xpress.
  • BAYLOR COLLEGE OF MEDICINE
    By Allison Huseman
    January 5, 2017
    Familial Test Helps Detect Genes that Cause Complex Diseases
    Featuring Dr. Richard Mayeux
    "A team of researchers at Baylor College of Medicine has developed a family-based association test that improves the detection in families of rare disease-causing variants of genes involved in complex conditions such as Alzheimer’s. The method is called the rare-variant generalized disequilibrium test (RV-GDT), and it incorporates rare, as opposed to common, genetic variants into the analysis..." [read more]
  • ABC NEW YORK
    November 22, 2016
    Live Web Chat: Understanding Alzheimer's Disease
    "There is a lot of fear and confusion concerning Alzheimer's Disease. What is it exactly and how does it compare with other types of dementia? Can it be prevented or managed - and if there is no cure, why are research and early detection critical?" [watch video]
  • CUMC NEWSROOM
    July 26, 2016
    Smell Test May Predict Early Stages of Alzheimer's Disease
    "Researchers from Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC), New York State Psychiatric Institute, and NewYork-Presbyterian reported that an odor identification test may prove useful in predicting cognitive decline and detecting early-stage Alzheimer’s disease." [read more]   [watch CBS New York video]

    Also covered by NPR: "'The whole idea is to create tests that a general clinician can use in an office setting,' says Dr. William Kreisl, a neurologist at Columbia University."

    And by: CNN, Healio, Medscape, Immortal News, Science Daily, Medical Daily, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Nature World News, MedPage Today, PsychCentral.com, CTV News, and Business Standard.
  • SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN
    By Esther Landhuis
    July 26, 2016
    Could Trashing Junk Proteins Quash Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, ALS and Huntington's?
    "Rather than going after proteins such as amyloid beta for Alzheimer’s or alpha-synuclein for Parkinson’s, one researcher has set on a different approach: 'I settled on the idea that perhaps we should just get rid of as many abnormally folded, nasty-looking proteins as possible,' says Karen Duff, a neuroscientist at Columbia University." [read more]
  • Enhancing Dentate Gyrus Function with Dietary Flavanols Improves Cognition in Older Adults
    Earlier this month, CBS News aired a feature on a joint, ongoing study by the Taub Institute (Drs. Scott Small and Adam Brickman) and the Division of Behavioral Medicine (Drs. Richard Sloan and Paula McKinley) on how dietary cocoa flavanols — naturally occurring bioactives found in cocoa —reversed age-related memory decline in healthy older adults. Previous results from a first study, published in Nature Neuroscience, provided the first direct evidence that one component of age-related memory decline in humans is caused by changes in a specific region of the brain and that this form of memory decline can be improved by a dietary intervention. These investigators are currently recruiting for another, larger study on the effects of cocoa flavanols.
  • NEWSWEEK
    January 1, 2016
    Building a Better Brain
    "The rule that 'neurons that fire together, wire together' suggests that cognitive training should boost mental prowess. Studies are finding just that, but with a crucial caveat. Training your memory, reasoning or speed of processing improves that skill, found a large government-sponsored study called Active. Unfortunately, there is no transfer: Improving processing speed does not improve memory, and improving memory does not improve reasoning. Similarly, doing crossword puzzles will only improve your ability to do crosswords. 'The research so far suggests that cognitive training benefits only the task used in training and does not generalize to other tasks,' says neuroscientist Yaakov Stern of Columbia University." [read more]
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