OPEN SURGERY
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Arterial Bypass Surgery

Bypass surgery for arterial occlusive disease requires general anesthesia. Surgically correcting the decreased blood flow through the renal or mesenteric artery requires the placement of a bypass graft on the artery. The graft is either made of synthetic material, or it may be a natural vein taken from another part of the body. During the procedure, the surgeon will make an incision to expose the diseased (blocked) artery, and then attach one end of a bypass graft to a point above the blockage in the artery and the other end to a point below the blockage. The blood supply will then be diverted through the graft, around the blockage, bypassing the diseased section of the artery. None of the diseased artery is removed. In-hospital recovery from the surgery will take 3-5 days.

In some cases, angioplasty and stenting, which are minimally invasive procedures, may be utilized instead of open surgery to treat arterial occlusive disease.



















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