CIRAR-Affiliated Funded Projects

2010

Grant # 2 R01 NR010107-04 Prevention of Nosocomial Infections and Cost-Effectiveness Refined (P-NICER)
PI: Patricia W. Stone, RN, PhD, MPH,
Professor of Nursing, Columbia University School of Nursing

In this competitive renewal to the P-NICE study, a 3-year mixed method study organized into two phases is proposed. The aims are 1) Use a descriptive exploratory approach to qualitatively describe the phenomena of infection prevention, surveillance, and control in hospitals; 2) Assess the impact of the intensity of infection control processes on device associated and organism specific HAI rates in adult and pediatric ICUs across the nation; and 3) Determine the impact of state regulated mandatory reporting on infection control processes and HAI rates.

Visit the P-NICER Web Site


2009

RC1 MD004109, Appropriate Care of URI in Children of Latino Immigrants: The ACURI Project
PI: Melissa Stockwell, MD, MPH, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics, College of Physicians & Surgeons of Columbia University and Assistant Professor of Population and Family Health, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University

R01 AI082536, Risk Factors for Spread of Staphylococcus aureus in Prisons
Co-PIs: Franklin D. Lowy, MD, Professor of Medicine and Pathology, Division of Infectious Diseases, College of Physicians & Surgeons of Columbia University and Elaine Larson, RN, PhD, Professor of Therapeutic and Pharmaceutical Research, Columbia University School of Nursing

Improving Health Literacy Regarding URI in Families in Home Visitation Programs
Co-PIs: Melissa Stockwell, MD, MPH, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics, College of Physicians & Surgeons of Columbia University and Assistant Professor of Population and Family Health, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University; Marina Catallozzi, MD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics, College of Physicians & Surgeons of Columbia University and Assistant Professor of Population and Family Health, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University; Elaine Larson, RN, PhD, Professor of Therapeutic and Pharmaceutical Research, Columbia University School of Nursing and Professor of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University

R13 HS018099, CMS Changes in Reimbursement for HAIs: Setting a Research Agenda
PI: Patricia W. Stone, RN, PhD, MPH, Associate Professor of Nursing, Columbia University School of Nursing
Co-PIs: Elaine Larson, RN, PhD, Professor of Therapeutic and Pharmaceutical Research; Sherry Glied, PhD, Professor and Chair, Department of Health Policy and Management; Lisa Saiman, MD, MPH, Professor of Clinical Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics

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2008

Improving Appropriate Use of Antibiotics for URI in Children of Recently Immigrated Latinos

Co-PIs:

  • Elaine Larson, RN, PhD, Professor of Therapeutic and Pharmaceutical Research, Columbia University School of Nursing and Professor of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University
  • Melissa Stockwell, MD, MPH, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics, College of Physicians & Surgeons of Columbia University and Assistant Professor of Population and Family Health, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University
  • Marina Catallozzi, MD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics, College of Physicians & Surgeons of Columbia University and Assistant Professor of Population and Family Health, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University

The long term goal of this project is to develop and test an intervention to decrease inappropriate antibiotic use for URI in children among recently immigrated Latino community members, based on the CDC action plan to combat antimicrobial resistance.

Thrasher Research Fund--New Researcher Award
Title: Persistence of Antibiotic Resistance Organisms in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Neonates: A Pilot Study
PI: Sameer J. Patel, MD, Clinical Fellow, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Infectious Diseases, Columbia University Medical Center
Mentor: Lisa Saiman, MD, MPH, Professor of Clinical Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, College of Physicians & Surgeons of Columbia University

The goal of this study is describe the rate of persistence of gastrointestinal antibiotic resistant organism (ARO) carriage in infants known to be colonized at discharge from the NICU to the community; determine risk factors for long term colonization (≥ 3 months); and to determine if AROs are transmitted between infants and mothers.

Grant # R01 NR010821
Title:
Improving Antimicrobial Prescribing Practices in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit
PI: Lisa Saiman, MD, MPH, Professor of Clinical Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, College of Physicians & Surgeons of Columbia University

The long-term objectives of this clinical trial are to reduce antimicrobial resistance by implementing innovative interdisciplinary interventions aimed to improve antibiotic prescribing practices in the neonatal intensive care unit and thereby define the optimal interventions for this population.

Grant # TS-1431 (5 U50 CD3000-860-21)
Title:
Impact of Automated Surveillance on MRSA Isolation
Co-PIs: Maryam Behta, PharmD, Director, Quality Research and Technology Utilization, Department of Information Services, NewYork-Presbyterian Healthcare Medical Centers, and Elaine Larson, RN, PhD, Professor of Therapeutic and Pharmaceutical Research, Columbia University School of Nursing and Professor of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University

Despite the fact that CDC publishes recommendations to prevent transmission of multiply-drug resistant organisms, the extent to which these are actually practiced is unclear. This project will test the impact of an automated surveillance system on the monitoring of and compliance with isolation precautions to prevent the spread of a major healthcare-associated pathogen, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

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2007

Grant # R01 CI000537
Title:
Applied Research in Antimicrobial Resistance: Studies of Susceptibility Testing on Gram-negative Multidrug Resistant Organisms
PI: Lisa Saiman, MD, MPH, Professor of Clinical Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, College of Physicians & Surgeons of Columbia University

The goals of this project are to: 1) determine strategies to improve the treatment of patients infected with MDR-GNB and thus improve clinical and microbiological outcomes of such infections, (2) assess which laboratory algorithms for in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing most closely correlate with improved outcomes for MDR-GNB infections, and (3) evaluate how healthcare professionals actually use in vitro susceptibility data to choose and modify treatment regimens for MDR-GNB infections.

Grant # T90 NR010824
Title:
Training in Interdisciplinary Research to Reduce Antimicrobial Resistance (TIRAR)
Program Co-Directors: Elaine Larson, RN, PhD, Professor of Therapeutic and Pharmaceutical Research, Columbia University School of Nursing and Professor of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University
Richard Kessin, PhD, Professor of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians & Surgeons of Columbia University

This training grant prepares pre- and post-doctoral scholars for participation and leadership in interdisciplinary research to reduce antimicrobial resistance by creating an interdisciplinary research curriculum; developing CIRAR pre- and postdoctoral training programs; implementing a faculty training program in interdisciplinary research; and developing and maintaining programmatic self-evaluation and revision mechanisms.

Grant # R01 NR010822
Title:
Distribution of the Costs of Antimicrobial Resistant Infections
PI: Elaine Larson, RN, PhD, Professor of Therapeutic and Pharmaceutical Research, Columbia University School of Nursing and Professor of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University

The project will develop estimates of the distribution of the extra costs associated with antimicrobial resistance and assess how policies that change incentives could spur adoption of effective interventions.

Grant # R21 NR010823
Title:
Electronic Communication for Antimicrobial Management (ECAM)
PI: Leanne Currie, RN, DNSc, Assistant Professor of Nursing, Columbia University School of Nursing

The goal of this study is to improve the appropriate and judicious use of antibiotics in the neonatal intensive care unit by developing and testing an automated method to remind clinicians to stop or change inappropriate antibiotics.

Grant # R01 NR010107
Title:
Prevention of Nosocomial Infections and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis (P-NICE)
PI: Patricia W. Stone, RN, PhD, MPH, Professor of Nursing, Columbia University School of Nursing

The aims of this study are to: 1) describe the level of infection control staffing and intensity of infection prevention and control interventions currently in place in intensive care units (ICU) across the nation; 2) determine associations between current infection control staffing and intensity of infection prevention and control interventions, and probability healthcare-associated infections and short term survival in elderly ICU patients; 3) estimate the long term outcomes attributable to healthcare-associated infections in elderly patients; and 4) determine the cost-effectiveness of effective infection control staffing and infection prevention and control interventions in ICU.

Visit the P-NICE Web Site

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