Distance (Web-
          Based) Learning

 "Ethics for Lunch"
          Series


          Video Presentations  
  Stem Cells
  Terri Schiavo
  Affirmative Action
          (Bollinger)
  Decisional Capacity

          Conferences  
  Ethics of Genetics
          in Research

  Current Issues in
          Research Ethics
          (CIRE)


          Courses  
  Medical Student
          Courses

  Undergraduate
          Student Courses

  BIOCEP

          Student Publications  
  Columbia Journal of
          Bioethics

 

Ethics For Lunch Series


The Ethics for Lunch series is an educational initiative that promotes humanism in medicine throughout the medical community. Three times a year, a clinician, serving as a humanistic role model, presents difficult cases from local ethics committees that emphasize ethical reasoning and decision making. Guiding the audience through the considerations of the case, the audience is encouraged to apply the principles of medical ethics to arrive at appropriate decisions for the patient's care. The audience experiences the often difficult, heart-rending, complex decision-making process that requires empathy, compassion, and respect. The Columbia University Center for Bioethics acknowledges the generous support of the Arnold P. Gold Foundation that made this series possible. For descriptions of past Ethics for Lunch events, please visit one of the links below. There is an audio tape or a DVD for each event available for loan on request from the Center for Bioethics Library.

 

 Prager, Kenneth, MD, November 2013, A Difficult Case for the New York-Presbyterian Hospital Ethics Committee: Can an Agent Override a Patient's Wishes? A Difficult Case of a Pregnant Jehovah's Witness.

 George Hardart, MD, MPH, March 2013, A Difficult Cases from the CHONY Ethics Committee: Whose Interests Count?

 Kenneth Prager, MD, November 2012, A Difficult Case for the New York-Presbyterian Hospital Ethics Committee: Transgender couple wants a baby

 John Lorenz, MD, March 2012, A Difficult Cases from the CHONY Ethics Committee: An Unusual Conflict Between a Gravely Ill Teenager and his Mother Over End of Life Treatment

 Kenneth Prager, MD, November 2011, A Difficult Case for the New York-Presbyterian Hospital Ethics Committee: When is it Ethical to Treat Someone Against His or Her Wishes?

 George Hardart, MD, MPH, March 2011, A Difficult Cases from the CHONY Ethics Committee: Cardiac Surgery for Children of Jehovah’s Witnesses: Subtleties Beyond Prince v. Massachusetts

Kenneth Prager, MD, November 2010, Misattributed Paternity:  What Should be Done when Testing for a Liver Donor Discloses an Incidental Finding that the Father who Volunteers to Donate a Lobe of his Liver for his Son is NOT the Child’s Biological Father?

 George Hardart, MD, MPH, March 2010, A Difficult Cases from the CHONY Ethics Committee: Newborns with Trisomy 18: To Treat or not to Treat? Have Times Changed?

 Kenneth Prager, MD, November 2009, A Difficult Case for the New York-Presbyterian Hospital Ethics Committee: Informing the Patient: “The Whole Truth and Nothing but the Truth”

 Kenneth Prager, MD, May 2009, A Difficult Case for the New York-Presbyterian Hospital Ethics Committee: Ethical Issues Posed by a Patient who Refuses to Preserve his Transplanted Organ and Chooses to Die

 Ken Prager, MD, May 2008, A Difficult Case from the New York-Presbyterian Hospital Ethics Committee: Must We Always Obey the Health Care Agent?

 John Lorenz, MD, March 2008, A Difficult Cases from the CHONY Ethics Committee.:Determining a Mother's Medical and Ethical Rights Over her Fetus and Newborn: Do They Change and, If So, When?

 Ken Prager, MD, November 2007, A Difficult Case from the New York-Presbyterian Hospital Ethics Committee: A Blind and Psychotic Patient Refusing Cataract Surgery: Beneficent Paternalism or Irrational Autonomy?

 Ken Prager, MD, and Paul Appelbaum, MD, May 2007, A Difficult Case from the New York-Presbyterian Hospital Ethics Committee: Does This Patient Have Decisional Capacity? How Can We Tell? Does It Matter?
To view the video of the event, please click here.

 John Lorenz, MD, March 2007, A Difficult Case from the Children’s Hospital New York-Presbyterian Ethics Committee: Choosing Comfort Care Is Just the Beginning

 Ken Prager, MD, November 2006, A Difficult Case from the New York-Presbyterian Hospital Ethics Committee: A Patient’s Request for Removal of A Ventricular Assist Device: Is It Ethical? Is It Legal?

 Ken Prager, MD, May 2006, A Difficult Case from the New York-Presbyterian Hospital Ethics Committee: Advertising for a Kidney: Is It Ethical? Is It Legal?

 John Lorenz, MD, February 2006, A Difficult Case from the Children’s Hospital New York-Presbyterian Ethics Committee: When Parents Request An Untested Experimental Therapy for Their Extremely Ill Child
Click here to view Dr. Lorenz's presentation.

 Ken Prager, MD, November 2005, Difficult Cases from the New York-Presbyterian Hospital Ethics Committee:Substituted Judgment: How Much Does the Proxy Really Know About the Patient's Wishes?

 Ken Prager, MD, with Randolph Marshall MD, David Lowenthal, MD, and Ruth Fischbach, PhD, MPE, May 2005, A Difficult Case from the New York-Presbyterian Hospital Ethics Committee: Ken Prager, MD, with Randolph Marshall, MD, David Lowenthal, MD, and Ruth Fischbach, PhD, MPE, May 2005, Medical Ethics’ Perfect Storm, A Retrospective Analysis and Guide for the Perplexed.
To view the video of the Schiavo event, please click here

 Barron Lerner, MD, PhD, March 2005, A Difficult Case from the New York-Presbyterian Hospital Ethics Committee: Does the Patient Have the Right to Refuse Lifesaving Surgery?

 Ken Prager, MD, October 2004, A Difficult Case from the New York-Presbyterian Hospital Ethics Committee: A Challenging Case of Medical Futility

 Ken Prager, MD, March 2004, A Difficult Case from the New York-Presbyterian Hospital Ethics Committee: Ethics of Sperm Retrieval from a Brain Dead Spouse


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